52nd New York State Legislature

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52nd New York State Legislature
Old State Capitol at Albany NY.jpg
The Old State Capitol (1879)

Duration: January 1 – December 31, 1829

President of the State Senate: Lt. Gov. Enos T. Throop (J), until March 12
Temporary President of the State Senate: Charles Stebbins (J), from March 12
Speaker of the State Assembly: Peter Robinson (J)
Members: 32 Senators
128 Assemblymen
Senate Majority: Jacksonian
Assembly Majority: Jacksonian

Sessions
1st: January 6 – May 5, 1829
<51st 53rd>

The 52nd New York State Legislature, consisting of the New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly, met from January 6 to May 5, 1829, during the short tenure of Martin Van Buren as Governor of New York, and—after Van Buren's resignation—during the first year of Enos T. Throop's governorship, in Albany.

Background[edit]

Under the provisions of the New York Constitution of 1821, 32 Senators were elected on general tickets in eight senatorial districts for four-year terms. They were divided into four classes, and every year eight Senate seats came up for election. Assemblymen were elected countywide on general tickets to a one-year term, the whole Assembly being renewed annually.

On January 31, 1828, a caucus of Jacksonian legislators nominated Andrew Jackson for U.S. President.

State Senator Charles H. Carroll resigned in March 1828, leaving a vacancy in the Eighth District.

On June 10, 1828, a state convention of Adams men met at Albany, and nominated U.S. President John Quincy Adams for re-election.

On July 22, a state convention of Adams men met at Utica; James Fairlie was Chairman; and Tilly Lynde and Thomas Clowes were Secretaries. They nominated U.S. Supreme Court Justice Smith Thompson for Governor, and Assemblyman Francis Granger for Lieutenant Governor.

The Anti-Masonic state convention nominated Assemblyman Francis Granger for Governor, and State Senator John Crary for Lieutenant Governor. Granger declined to run for this office on this ticket, and expected Crary to decline too, so that he, Granger, could be endorsed by the Anti-Masons for Lieutenant Governor. Crary, however, did not decline and ran on the Anti-Masonic ticket with Solomon Southwick for Governor.

The Jacksonian state convention met at Herkimer and nominated U.S. Senator Martin Van Buren for Governor and Circuit Judge Enos T. Throop for Lieutenant Governor.

At the time of the election in November 1828, there were three political parties: the "Jacksonians" (supporting the election of Andrew Jackson for U.S. President; led by U.S. Senator Martin Van Buren), the "Adams men" (supporters of the re-election of President John Quincy Adams), and the "Anti-Masons". After the defeat of Adams, the Adams men became known as "Anti-Jacksonians".

Elections[edit]

The State election was held from November 3 to 5, 1828. Martin Van Buren and Enos T. Throop were elected Governor and Lieutenant Governor. 18 presidential electors for Andrew Jackson, and 16 for John Quincy Adams were elected in the congressional districts; and they co-opted another 2 Jacksonian electors-at-large.

Stephen Allen (1st D.), Samuel Rexford (2nd D.), Lewis Eaton (3rd D.), John McLean Jr. (4th D.), William H. Maynard (5th D.), John F. Hubbard (6th D.), Hiram F. Mather (7th D.) and Moses Hayden (8th D.) were elected to full terms in the Senate. George H. Boughton (8th D.) was elected to fill the vacancy. McLean was an Adams man; Maynard, Mather, Boughton and Hayden were Anti-Masons; the other four were Jacksonians.

Sessions[edit]

The Legislature met for the regular session at the Old State Capitol in Albany on January 6, 1829; and adjourned on May 5.

Peter Robinson (J) was elected Speaker.

On January 15, the Legislature elected Charles E. Dudley (J) to the seat in the U.S. Senate vacated by Martin Van Buren after his election as Governor.

On January 27, the Legislature re-elected Secretary of State Azariah C. Flagg, Surveyor General Simeon De Witt, and State Treasurer Abraham Keyser, Jr.; and elected Congressman Silas Wright, Jr. to succeed William L. Marcy as State Comptroller; and Greene C. Bronson to succeed Samuel A. Talcott as Attorney General.

On March 12, Gov. Martin Van Buren resigned to take office as U.S. Secretary of State, Lt. Gov. Enos T. Throop succeeded to the governorship, and Charles Stebbins (J) was elected Temporary President of the State Senate.

On April 2, the Legislature enacted the Bank Safety Fund Law which, among other things, created the office of Bank Commissioner.

On April 15, the Legislature enacted that henceforth the presidential electors should be elected statewide by general ticket, instead of in single districts.

State Senate[edit]

Districts[edit]

Note: There are now 62 counties in the State of New York. The counties which are not mentioned in this list had not yet been established, or sufficiently organized, the area being included in one or more of the abovementioned counties.

Members[edit]

The asterisk (*) denotes members of the previous Legislature who continued in office as members of this Legislature.

District Senators Term left Party Notes
First Joshua Smith* 1 year
Robert Bogardus* 2 years Jacksonian resigned on May 4, 1829
John I. Schenck* 3 years Jacksonian
Stephen Allen 4 years Jacksonian
Second Peter R. Livingston* 1 year Jacksonian
Benjamin Woodward* 2 years also Postmaster of Mount Hope
Walker Todd* 3 years Jacksonian also Postmaster of Carmel
Samuel Rexford 4 years Jacksonian
Third Ambrose L. Jordan* 1 year Adams man resigned on January 7, 1829
John McCarty* 2 years Jacksonian
Moses Warren* 3 years Jacksonian
Lewis Eaton 4 years Jacksonian
Fourth John L. Viele* 1 year
Duncan McMartin Jr.* 2 years Adams man
Reuben Sanford* 3 years Adams man
John McLean Jr. 4 years Adams man
Fifth Charles Stebbins* 1 year Jacksonian elected President pro tempore
Truman Enos* 2 years Jacksonian
Nathaniel S. Benton* 3 years Jacksonian
William H. Maynard 4 years Anti-Mason
Sixth Peter Hager 2d* 1 year
Thomas G. Waterman* 2 years
Grattan H. Wheeler* 3 years Adams man
John F. Hubbard 4 years Jacksonian
Seventh Truman Hart* 1 year
William M. Oliver* 2 years Jacksonian
George B. Throop* 3 years Jacksonian
Hiram F. Mather 4 years Anti-Mason
Eighth Ethan B. Allen* 1 year
George H. Boughton 2 years Anti-Mason elected to fill vacancy, in place of Charles H. Carroll
Timothy H. Porter* 3 years Adams man
Moses Hayden 4 years Anti-Mason

Employees[edit]

State Assembly[edit]

Districts[edit]

Note: There are now 62 counties in the State of New York. The counties which are not mentioned in this list had not yet been established, or sufficiently organized, the area being included in one or more of the abovementioned counties.

Assemblymen[edit]

The asterisk (*) denotes members of the previous Legislature who continued as members of this Legislature.

District Assemblymen Party Notes
Albany James D. Gardner
Moses Stanton
Chandler Starr Adams man
Allegany Azel Fitch*
Broome Peter Robinson* Jacksonian elected Speaker
Cattaraugus Flavel Partridge
Cayuga Henry R. Brinckerhoff*
Ephraim Hammond Jacksonian
William H. Noble* Jacksonian
Wing Taber
Chautauqua Abner Hazeltine Anti-Mason
Nathan Mixer*
Chenango Russel Case
Abel Chandler
Amos A. Franklin
Clinton Bela Edgerton*
Columbia Abraham P. Holdridge
Henry W. Livingston
Peter Van Beuren
Cortland Alanson Carley
Gideon Curtiss
Delaware William S. McCrea
James G. Redfield
Dutchess Elijah Baker Jr.
Stoddard Judd Jacksonian
Stephen D. Van Wyck
vacant?
Erie David Burt*
Millard Fillmore Anti-Mason
Essex Ezra C. Gross* Adams man died on April 9, 1829
Franklin Luther Bradish* Adams man
Genesee Calvin P. Bailey
John Hascall
John B. Skinner* J./A.-M.[1]
Greene Moses Austin
Castle Seeley
Hamilton and
Montgomery
Phineas Randall
Joseph Spier
Peter Young
Herkimer John B. Dygert
Abijah Mann, Jr.* Jacksonian
Cornelius Sloughter
Jefferson Jere Carrier
Titus Ives
Fleury Keith
Kings John Wyckoff
Lewis George D. Ruggles*
Livingston Philo C. Fuller Anti-Mason
Titus Goodman Jr.
Madison James B. Eldredge
William K. Fuller Jacksonian
John Williams
Monroe John Garbutt
Heman Norton
Reuben Willey
New York William Alburtis* Jacksonian
Nathan T. Arnold
Jacob S. Bogert Jacksonian
Abraham Cargill* Jacksonian
Aaron O. Dayton
Jacob G. Dyckman
Charles L. Livingston Jacksonian
Mordecai Myers
Thomas L. Smith
Peter S. Titus Jacksonian
John Van Beuren Jacksonian
Niagara John Garnsey*
Oneida Reuben Bacon
Benjamin P. Johnson*
Eli Savage* Jacksonian
Reuben Tower
Fortune C. White
Onondaga Johnson Hall Jacksonian
Herman Jenkins
Samuel B. Mathews
Lewis Smith
Ontario John Dickson Anti-Mason
Mathew Hubbell
Robert C. Nicholas* Anti-Mason
Orange Robert Fowler
Richard Graham
James Waugh
Orleans George W. Fleming
Oswego George H. Falley
Otsego Peter Collier
William Hall
Seth Hubbard Jr.
George Morell
Putnam Thomas W. Tailor
Queens Henry Floyd-Jones Jacksonian
Rensselaer Nathaniel Barnett Jr.
Martin Defreest
William P. Heermans
Henry Mallary
Richmond John Vanderbilt
Rockland George S. Allison Jacksonian
St. Lawrence Jonah Sanford Jacksonian
Harvey D. Smith
Saratoga Joshua Mandeville
Gilbert Waring
Calvin Wheeler unsuccessfully contested by Harvey Granger[2]
Schenectady Alonzo C. Paige* Jacksonian also Reporter of the New York Court of Chancery
Schoharie Valentine Efner Jacksonian
Peter Hynds
Seneca Septimus Evans contested by Daniel W. Bostwick who
was seated on January 29[3]
Daniel Scott
Steuben Randall Graves
Henry Phoenix
Suffolk David Hedges Jr.
John M. Williamson
Sullivan John Lindsley
Tioga Caleb Baker
Samuel Barager
Tompkins Amasa Dana* Jacksonian also D.A. of Tompkins Co.
Samuel H. Dean*
Jonathan B. Gosman Jacksonian
Ulster Lodewyck Hornbeck
Abraham D. Soper
Warren William McDonald
Washington John McDonald
Robert McNeil
Richard Sill
Wayne Thomas Armstrong* Jacksonian also Supervisor of Butler, and Chairman
of the Board of Supervisors of Wayne Co.
Jonathan Boynton
Westchester Aaron Brown Jacksonian
Lawrence Davenport Jacksonian
Abel Smith Jacksonian
Yates Morris F. Sheppard*

Employees[edit]

  • Clerk: Francis Seger
  • Sergeant-at-Arms: John C. Ellis
  • Doorkeeper: James D. Scollard
  • Assistant Doorkeeper: Alonzo Crosby

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Skinner was a Jacksonian, re-"elected as an anti-mason", see Hammond, pg. 293
  2. ^ see A Compilation of Cases of Contested Elections to Seats in the Assembly of the State of New York (1871; pg. 83–93)
  3. ^ see A Compilation of Cases of Contested Elections to Seats in the Assembly of the State of New York (1871; pg. 76–82)

Sources[edit]