563d Rescue Group

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563d Rescue Group
HC-130J at Davis-Monthan.jpg
The crew of the first HC-130J in front of their plane on Davis-Monthan AFB
Active 1944 - 1957, 1965 - 1976, 2003 – present
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Role Combat Search and Rescue
Part of 23rd Wing
Garrison/HQ Headquartered at: Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona with worldwide operating locations
Insignia
563d Rescue Group emblem (Approved 18 March 1968)[1] 563d Rescue Group - Emblem.png

The United States Air Force's 563d Rescue Group (563 RQG) directs flying operations dedicated to Personnel Recovery (PR). The 563 RQG is part of the Air Combat Command (ACC) and is a geographically separated unit (GSU) of the 23d Wing (23 WG) at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. The home station for the 563 RQG is Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona and it also has responsibility for rescue squadrons operating as GSUs at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.

The group is responsible for training, readiness, and operations of one HC-130J squadron, two HH-60G squadrons, two Guardian Angel squadrons, and an operations support squadron operating from two geographically separated operating locations.

Units[edit]

  • 563d Operations Support Squadron
The 563d Operations Support Squadron supports all aspects of the training and employment of the 563d Rescue Group's six combat-ready HC-130J, HH-60, Guardian Angel, and support squadrons totaling over 700 military and civilian personnel. It provides all operational support functions including weapons and tactics, current operations, intelligence, training, life support, mobility, and flying hour program management. As a worldwide deployable unit, it also is responsible for implementing contingency and theater war plans.
The 79th Rescue Squadron operates the HC-130P/E "Hercules" and provides rapidly deployable combat rescue forces to theater commanders worldwide. It conducts helicopter air refueling, airdrop and airland of Guardian Angel personnel and/or equipment in support of combat personnel recovery. Its crews are capable of landings on short, unimproved, runways and low-level operations during day or night with night vision goggles.
The 48th Rescue Squadron trains, equips and employs combat-ready pararescuemen, combat rescue officers and supporting personnel worldwide in support of U.S. national security interests. It provides survivor contact, treatment and extraction during combat rescue operations, uses various fixed and rotary wing insertion and extraction assets. It employs by any means available to provide combat and humanitarian search, rescue and medical assistance in all environments.
The 55th Rescue Squadron operates the HH-60G "Pavehawk" and provides rapidly deployable combat rescue forces to theater commanders worldwide. They tactically employ the HH-60G helicopter and its crew in hostile environments to recover downed aircrew and isolated personnel during day, night or marginal weather conditions. The squadron also conducts military operations other than war including; civil search and rescue, disaster relief, international aid, emergency medical evacuation and counter-drug activities.

The 58th Rescue Squadron trains, equips and employs combat-ready pararescuemen, combat rescue officers and supporting personnel worldwide in support of U.S. national security interests. It provides survivor contact, treatment and extraction during combat rescue operations, uses various fixed and rotary wing insertion and extraction assets. It employs by any means available to provide combat and humanitarian search, rescue and medical assistance in all environments.

The 66th Rescue Squadron operates the HH-60G "Pavehawk" and provides rapidly deployable combat rescue forces to theater commanders worldwide. They tactically employ the HH-60G helicopter and its crew in hostile environments to recover downed aircrew and isolated personnel during day, night or marginal weather conditions. The squadron also conducts military operations other than war including; civil search and rescue, disaster relief, international aid, emergency medical evacuation and counter-drug activities.

History[edit]

Flew combat rescue and evacuation missions 1944–1945 at Biak Island and in the Philippines. Provided courier service, carried supplies and messages, evacuated allied prisoners and wounded personnel, and occasionally provided reconnaissance.

From 1946–1950 provided rescue capabilities in Japan. Flew combat rescue and evacuation missions during the Korean War, 1950–1953. Credited with rescuing almost 10,000 United Nations personnel, including almost 1,000 combat saves behind enemy lines.

Returned to providing rescue capability in Japan, 1953–1957. Performed combat search, rescue, and recovery missions in Southeast Asia, 1966–1975. Credited with 3,681 saves, including 2,632 combat saves. Operated a Joint Service Rescue Center at Tan Son Nhut AB, Vietnam, for Commander, Seventh Air Force, 1966–1973.

Lineage[edit]

  • Constituted as the3d Emergency Rescue Squadron on 14 February 1944
Activated on 15 February 1944
Redesignated 3d Rescue Squadron on 28 January 1948
Redesignated 3d Air Rescue Squadron on 10 August 1950
Redesignated 3d Air Rescue Group on 14 November 1952
Inactivated on 18 June 1957
  • Redesignated 3d Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Group and activated, on 14 December 1965 (not organized)
Organized on 8 January 1966
Inactivated on 31 January 1976
  • Redesignated 563d Rescue Group on 29 July 2003
Activated on 1 October 2003[1]

Assignments[edit]

Under operational control of V Bomber Command, 26 August – 2 October 1944
Attached to Fifth Air Force, 1 May 1949, 314th Air Division, 18 May 1951, Japanese Air Defense Force, 14 November 1952, Far East Air Forces, 1 August 1954 – 18 June 1957
  • Pacific Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Center (later 41st Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Wing; 41st Rescue and Weather Reconnaissance Wing), 8 January 1966 – 31 January 1976
  • 347th Rescue Wing, 1 October 2003
  • 23d Wing, 1 October 2006 – present[1]

Components[edit]

Stations[edit]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Bailey, Carl E. (January 2, 2008). "Factsheet 563 Rescue Group (AFSOC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved May 5, 2015. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.