588 Achilles

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588 Achilles
Discovery
Discovered by Max Wolf
Discovery date February 22, 1906
Designations
Named after
Achilles
1906 TG
Minor planet category Trojan asteroid
Adjectives Achillean
Orbital characteristics
Epoch October 22, 2004 (JD 2453300.5)
Aphelion 890.944 Gm (5.956 AU)
Perihelion 662.395 Gm (4.428 AU)
776.669 Gm (5.192 AU)
Eccentricity 0.147
4320.803 d (11.83 a)
13.00 km/s
157.779°
Inclination 10.324°
316.583°
132.770°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 135.5 km[1]
Mass 2.6×1018 kg
Mean density
2.0 g/cm³
0.0379 m/s²
0.0716 km/s
7.3 hr[1]
Albedo 0.0328[1]
Spectral type
D[1]
8.67[1]

588 Achilles is an asteroid discovered on February 22, 1906, by the German astronomer Max Wolf. It was the first of the trojan asteroids to be discovered, and is named after Achilles, the fictional hero from the Iliad. It orbits in the L4 Lagrangian point of the Sun-Jupiter system. After a few such asteroids were discovered, the rule was established that the L4 point was the "Greek camp", while the L5 point was the "Trojan camp", though not before each camp had acquired a "spy" (624 Hektor in the Greek camp and 617 Patroclus in the Trojan camp).

Based on IRAS data, Achilles is 135 km in diameter and is the 6th largest Jupiter Trojan.[2]

JPL Small-Body Database list of the largest Jupiter Trojans based on IRAS data:
Trojan Diameter (km)
624 Hektor 225
911 Agamemnon 167
1437 Diomedes 164
1172 Äneas 143
617 Patroclus 141
588 Achilles 135
1173 Anchises 126
1143 Odysseus 126

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 1994 were used to build a light curve showing a rotation period of 7.32 ± 0.02 hours with a brightness variation of 0.31 ± 0.01 magnitude. This result is in good agreement with prior studies.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 588 Achilles (1906 TG)". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 2012-02-23 last obs. 
  2. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: orbital class (TJN) and diameter > 50 (km)". JPL's Solar System Dynamics Group. Retrieved 2012-03-28. 
  3. ^ Mottola, Stefano; Di Martino, Mario; Erikson, Anders; Gonano-Beurer, Maria; Carbognani, Albino; Carsenty, Uri; Hahn, Gerhard; Schober, Hans-Josef; Lahulla, Felix; Delbò, Marco; Lagerkvist, Claes-Ingvar (May 2011). "Rotational Properties of Jupiter Trojans. I. Light Curves of 80 Objects". The Astronomical Journal 141 (5): 170. Bibcode:2011AJ....141..170M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/5/170.  edit

External links[edit]