5 Songs (The Decemberists EP)

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5 Songs
EP by The Decemberists
Released 2001 (2001)
Recorded Type Foundry Studio
Portland, OR
2001
Genre Indie folk, indie rock
Length 23:52
Label Self-released
Hush Records (2003)
Producer Jason Powers
The Decemberists EP chronology
5 Songs
(2001)
The Tain
(2004)

5 Songs is a six-track EP by The Decemberists initially self-released in 2001. It is the first record the band released. The misleading title owes to the fact that the final track, "Apology Song" (originally sung by frontman Colin Meloy into the answering machine of a friend named Steven as a legitimate apology for the loss of a beloved bicycle named Madeline), was written after the original self-produced CD was released. Meloy liked it so much that it was added to the album when it was re-released by Hush Records in 2003.

The album cover was designed by the Portland artist Carson Ellis, the long-time girlfriend (and now wife) of Meloy, who has created artwork for each of the band's albums.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Colin Meloy.

No. Title Length
1. "Oceanside"   3:29
2. "Shiny"   5:12
3. "My Mother Was a Chinese Trapeze Artist"   4:42
4. "Angel, Won't You Call Me?"   2:40
5. "I Don't Mind"   4:40
6. "Apology Song"   3:12
Total length:
23:52

Trivia[edit]

"Apology Song" contains several references to the town of Missoula, Montana. The "Orange Street Food Farm" is a local grocery store popular with University of Montana students (mostly for buying beer). The "Frenchtown Pond" is a reference to Frenchtown Pond State Park located in Frenchtown which is approximately 15 miles northwest of Missoula. Meloy told audiences on 2 October 2007 at Royal Festival Hall how they reclaimed the bicycle years later, only for it to be crushed between cars when he was helping the true owner of the bike move house.[citation needed]

"My Mother Was a Chinese Trapeze Artist" was originally released in a slightly more "country" version on Meloy's pre-Decemberists, Tarkio EP, Sea Songs For Landlocked Sailors, in 1999, and was re-released in 2005 on the Kill Rock Stars compilation of all Tarkio releases, Omnibus.[citation needed]