Belgian coins of World War II

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During World War II, the Belgian government needed to mint coins using metal that would not be needed for the war effort. Therefore, Silver was discontinued in order to preserve it, so the coinage became pure Zinc

In 1944, shortly before the Liberation, the Allies minted 25 million 2 franc coins at the Philadelphia Mint, which were put in circulation after Belgium regained its independence.

Occupation coinage[edit]

One Franc[edit]

The 1 franc coin, showing arms of Brabant and the state title on the obverse and the royal monogram on the reverse.

The 1 Franc coin was circulated through Belgium from 1941.

Belgique-Belgie lettering
Year Mintage Notes
1941 16,000,000
1942 25,000,000
1943 28,000,000
1947 3,175,000 Rare

[1]

Belgie-Belgique lettering
Year Mintage Notes
1942 42,000,000
1943 28,000,000
1944 24,190,000
1945 15,930,000
1946 36,000,000
1947 3,000,000 Rare

[2]

Five Francs[edit]

The 5 franc coin, showing the monogramme and bust of King Leopold III

The 5 franc coin was minted between 1941 and 1947, first by the Germans during the occupation of Belgium, and then by the Belgian government after the end of World War II. The coin composed of 100% zinc, and was an emergency issue type.

Year Mintage Notes
1941 15,200,000
1943 16,236,000
1943 Rare
1944 1,868,000 Rare
1945 3,200,000 Rare
1946 8,452,000 Rare
1947 3,100,000 Rare

[3]

Five Centimes[edit]

The 5 centimes coin was minted between 1941 and 1943 during the German occupation. The coin composed of 100% zinc, and was an emergency issue type. There are also two different varieties. The Centime is a sub-unit of the franc. It is 1/100 of a franc.

Belgique-Belgie lettering
Year Mintage Notes
1941 10,000,000
1943 7,606,000

[1]

Belgie-Belgique lettering
Year Mintage Notes
1941 4,000,000
1942 18,430,000

[2]

Ten Centimes[edit]

The 10 centime coin, showing three provincial shields in addition to the monogramme of Leopold III

The 10 centimes coin was minted between 1941 and 1946, first by the Germans during the occupation of Belgium, and then by the Belgian government after World War II ended. The coin composed of 100% zinc, and was an emergency issue type. There are also two different varieties.

Belgique-Belgie lettering
Year Mintage Notes
1941 10,000,000
1942 17,000,000
1943 22,500,000
1945 Rare
1946 10,370,000 Rare

[1]

Belgie-Belgique lettering
Year Mintage Notes
1941 7,000,000
1942 21,000,000
1943 22,000,000
1944 28,000,000
1945 8,000,000
1946 10,370,000

[2]

Twenty-five Centimes[edit]

The 25 centime coin, showing three provincial shields in addition to the monogramme of Leopold III

The 25 centimes coin was minted between 1941 and 1947, first by the Germans during the occupation, and then by the Belgian government after World War II ended. The coin composed of 100% zinc, and was an emergency issue type. There are also two different varieties.

Belgique-Belgie lettering
Year Mintage Notes
1941 Rare
1942 14,400,000
1943 21,600,000
1945 Rare
1946 21,428,000
1947 300,000 Rare (Not circulated)

[1]

Belgie-Belgique lettering
Year Mintage Notes
1942 14,400,000
1943 21,600,000
1944 25,960,000
1945 8,200,000
1946 11,652,000
1947 316,000 (Est. mintage) Rare

[2]

Liberation coinage[edit]

Two Francs[edit]

The zinc-coated steel 2 franc coin. Only one variant was minted.

The 2 franc coin was minted by the United States in 1944 in preparation for the Allied liberation of Belgium. An Allied Occupation Issue, this coin was made with the blank planchets of the 1943 steel Wheat penny.[4] Some of these coins have a slightly different weight, and thus their blank planchets would have been specifically made for this foreign denomination.

Year Mintage Notes
1944 25,000,000

[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "1 Franc - Leopold III (Belgique-Belgie) - Belgium - Numista". Retrieved 2001-01-15. 
  2. ^ a b c d "1 Franc - Leopold III (Belgie-Belgique) - Belgium 1942-1947 - Numista". 
  3. ^ a b "5 Francs - Leopold III - (French text) - Belgium - Numista". Retrieved 2013-01-15. 
  4. ^ 2013 Standard Catalog of World Coins[page needed]