620s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 6th century7th century8th century
Decades: 590s 600s 610s620s630s 640s 650s
Years: 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

This is a list of events occurring in the 620s, ordered by year.

620[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Britain[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

621[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Technology[edit]

  • The Chinese establish an imperial bureau for the manufacture of porcelain. Their technology will advance further under the Tang Dynasty (approximate date).

622[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

  • July 16Muhammad emigrates his community (the movement is called the Hijra) to Medina, a large agricultural oasis in Saudi Arabia. There he formally establish the Muslim community, beginning the Muslim calendar in that year, renaming it "Year One" of the Anno Hegirae (AH). He continues to preach and recite the words which Allah reveals to him. It is these passages, together with the earlier revelations at Mecca, which are written down in the Arabic script by his followers and are collected to become the Qur'an - word (often transliterated as Koran). Muhammad becomes a religious, political and even military leader.[5]
  • Xuanzang is fully ordained as a Buddhist monk at the age of 20.[6]

623[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]

Religion[edit]

624[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabia[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

625[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Britain[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

626[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Persia[edit]

  • Summer – King Khosrau II plans an all-out effort against Constantinople. He returns to Anatolia with two armies — of unknown size, presumably more than 50,000 men each. One of these (possibly commanded by Khosrau himself) is to contain Heraclius in Pontus; another under Shahin Vahmanzadegan is defeated by Theodore.

Asia[edit]

627[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Education[edit]

628[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Britain[edit]

Persia[edit]

Arabia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]

Education[edit]

Religion[edit]

  • Muhammad's letters to world leaders explain the principles of the new monotheistic Muslim faith, as they will be contained in his book, the Quran, which will instruct its readers, "Fight the unbelievers who are near to you".

629[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabia[edit]

Asia[edit]

Mesoamerica[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century (1991), John V.A. Fine, Jr, p. 36. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3
  2. ^ The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century (1991), John V.A. Fine, Jr, p. 42. ISBN 978-0472-08149-3
  3. ^ Roger Collins, "Visigothic Spain 409–711", p. 76
  4. ^ Kaegi 2003, p. 116
  5. ^ Sardar, Ziauddin (24 June 1982). "The astronomy of Ramadan". New Scientist 94 (1311): 854. ISSN 0262-4079. 
  6. ^ Howgego, Raymond John (2003). Encyclopedia of exploration to 1800. Hordern House. p. 522. ISBN 978-1-875567-36-2. 
  7. ^ Rome at War (AD 293–696), p. 61. Michael Whitby, 2002. ISBN 1-84176-359-4
  8. ^ The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century (1991), John V.A. Fine, Jr, p. 43. ISBN 978-0472-08149-3
  9. ^ Kaegi, Walther Emil (2003), Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium, Cambridge University Press, p. 127. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  10. ^ Kaegi, Walther Emil (2003), Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium, Cambridge University Press, p. 128. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  11. ^ Kaegi, Walther Emil (2003), Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium, Cambridge University Press, p. 129. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  12. ^ Fryde, E.B. (1996), "Handbook of British Chronology" (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, p. 213. ISBN 0-521-56350-X
  13. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 131. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  14. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 132. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  15. ^ The Walls of Constantinople AD 324–1453, p. 47. Stephen Turnbull, 2004. ISBN 978-1-84176-759-8
  16. ^ Bede, H. E. Book II, chapter 9. Bede calls these two islands the Mevanian Islands
  17. ^ "Anglo-Saxon Chronicle", Manuscript A (ASC A), 626
  18. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 144. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  19. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 167. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  20. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 173. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  21. ^ Oman, Charles (1893), "Europe, 476–918", Volume 1 (p. 211)
  22. ^ Norwich, John Julius (1997), "A Short History of Byzantium", Vintage Books, p. 93. ISBN 0-679-77269-3
  23. ^ Watt, "Muhammad at Medina", p. 36
  24. ^ Bede, H.E. Volume II, chapter 14
  25. ^ "St. Columbanus". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company (1913)
  26. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 178, 189–190. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  27. ^ Christian 283; Artamanov, p. 170–180
  28. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  29. ^ Palmer, Alan & Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 30–34. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2. 
  30. ^ Rodney Aist, "The Christian Topography of Early Islamic Jerusalem", Brepols Publishers (2009), p. 59
  31. ^ Bury 2008, p. 245