628

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This article is about the year 628. For the number, see 628 (number).
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 6th century7th century8th century
Decades: 590s  600s  610s  – 620s –  630s  640s  650s
Years: 625 626 627628629 630 631
628 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
628 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 628
DCXXVIII
Ab urbe condita 1381
Armenian calendar 77
ԹՎ ՀԷ
Assyrian calendar 5378
Bahá'í calendar −1216 – −1215
Bengali calendar 35
Berber calendar 1578
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1172
Burmese calendar −10
Byzantine calendar 6136–6137
Chinese calendar 丁亥(Fire Pig)
3324 or 3264
    — to —
戊子年 (Earth Rat)
3325 or 3265
Coptic calendar 344–345
Discordian calendar 1794
Ethiopian calendar 620–621
Hebrew calendar 4388–4389
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 684–685
 - Shaka Samvat 550–551
 - Kali Yuga 3729–3730
Holocene calendar 10628
Igbo calendar −372 – −371
Iranian calendar 6–7
Islamic calendar 6–7
Japanese calendar N/A
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 628
DCXXVIII
Korean calendar 2961
Minguo calendar 1284 before ROC
民前1284年
Thai solar calendar 1171
Coin of king Ardashir III (c. 621–630)

Year 628 (DCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 628 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Britain[edit]

Persia[edit]

Arabia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]

Education[edit]

Religion[edit]

  • Muhammad's letters to world leaders explain the principles of the new monotheistic Muslim faith, as they will be contained in his book, the Quran, which will instruct its readers, "Fight the unbelievers who are near to you".

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 178, 189–190. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  2. ^ Christian 283; Artamanov, p. 170–180
  3. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  4. ^ Palmer, Alan & Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 30–34. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.