631

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This article is about the year 631. For the number, see 631 (number). For other uses, see 631 (disambiguation).
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 6th century7th century8th century
Decades: 600s  610s  620s  – 630s –  640s  650s  660s
Years: 628 629 630631632 633 634
631 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
631 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 631
DCXXXI
Ab urbe condita 1384
Armenian calendar 80
ԹՎ Ձ
Assyrian calendar 5381
Bahá'í calendar −1213 – −1212
Bengali calendar 38
Berber calendar 1581
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1175
Burmese calendar −7
Byzantine calendar 6139–6140
Chinese calendar 庚寅(Metal Tiger)
3327 or 3267
    — to —
辛卯年 (Metal Rabbit)
3328 or 3268
Coptic calendar 347–348
Discordian calendar 1797
Ethiopian calendar 623–624
Hebrew calendar 4391–4392
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 687–688
 - Shaka Samvat 553–554
 - Kali Yuga 3732–3733
Holocene calendar 10631
Igbo calendar −369 – −368
Iranian calendar 9–10
Islamic calendar 9–10
Japanese calendar N/A
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 631
DCXXXI
Korean calendar 2964
Minguo calendar 1281 before ROC
民前1281年
Thai solar calendar 1174
King Sisenand (c. 605–636)

Year 631 (DCXXXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 631 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Persia[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • Emperor Tai Zong sends envoys to the Xueyantuo, vassals of the Eastern Turkic Khaganate, bearing gold and silk in order to obtain the release of enslaved Chinese prisoners who are captured during the transition from the Sui to the Tang Dynasty from the northern frontier. The embassy succeeds in freeing 80,000 men and women who are safely returned to China.
  • Tai Zong establishes a new Daoist abbey, out of gratitude for Daoist priests who had apparently cured the crown prince of an illness.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]