656

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This article is about the year 656. For the number, see 656 (number).
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 6th century7th century8th century
Decades: 620s  630s  640s  – 650s –  660s  670s  680s
Years: 653 654 655656657 658 659
656 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
656 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 656
DCLVI
Ab urbe condita 1409
Armenian calendar 105
ԹՎ ՃԵ
Assyrian calendar 5406
Bahá'í calendar −1188 – −1187
Bengali calendar 63
Berber calendar 1606
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1200
Burmese calendar 18
Byzantine calendar 6164–6165
Chinese calendar 乙卯(Wood Rabbit)
3352 or 3292
    — to —
丙辰年 (Fire Dragon)
3353 or 3293
Coptic calendar 372–373
Discordian calendar 1822
Ethiopian calendar 648–649
Hebrew calendar 4416–4417
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 712–713
 - Shaka Samvat 578–579
 - Kali Yuga 3757–3758
Holocene calendar 10656
Igbo calendar −344 – −343
Iranian calendar 34–35
Islamic calendar 35–36
Japanese calendar N/A
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 656
DCLVI
Korean calendar 2989
Minguo calendar 1256 before ROC
民前1256年
Thai solar calendar 1199
King Sigebert III of Austrasia (c. 630–656)

Year 656 (DCLVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 656 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • Empress Saimei of Japan builds a new palace at Asuka (Nara Prefecture), because her former residence took fire. This construction is called the "Mad Canal" by the people of that day, wasting the labor of tens of thousand workers and a large amount of money.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Great Islamic Conquests AD 632–750, David Nicolle (2009), p. 62. ISBN 978-1-84603-273-8
  2. ^ The Caliphate Its Rise, Decline and Fall by William Muir. Chapter XXXV, Battle of the Camel, p. 250