22nd Mechanised Brigade (Ukraine)

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293rd Rifle Division (1941–43)
66th Guards Rifle Division (1943–57)
66th Guards Motor Rifle Division (1957–60)
66th Guards Training Motor Rifle Division (1960–87)
110th Guards Separate Training Center (1987–1992)
66th Mechanized Division (1992–2000)
22nd Mechanized Brigade (2000–2003)
66md.jpg
Sleeve Patch for 66th Mechanized Division
Active July 18, 1941–2003[1]
Country Ukraine
Branch Red Army 1941–1991
Ukrainian Ground Forces 1992–2003
Type Mechanized
Size 3,000 (2003)[1]
Part of 38th Army
38th Army Corps
Garrison/HQ Chernivtsi[1] Chernivtsi Oblast Ukraine
Anniversaries July 18, 1941
Engagements Second Battle of Kharkov
Operation Uranus
Battle of Kursk
Lower Dnepr strategic offensive operation
Korsun-Shevchenkovsky Offensive Operation
Lvov-Sandomierz Offensive
East Carpathian Strategic Offensive Operation
Carpathian-Uzhgorod Offensive Operation
Battle of Budapest
Balaton Defensive Operation
Vienna Offensive
Hungarian Revolution of 1956
Decorations Order of the Red Banner
Battle honours Poltava, Bukovyna
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Major General Pavel Lagutin (1st Commander)
Insignia
Soviet Guards badge Гвардия.png
Ukrainian Guards badge Ukrainian guards.jpg
Mechanized branch insignia Ukr mechanized.jpg

The 22nd Mechanised Brigade was a formation of the Ukrainian Ground Forces from 2000-2003. However most of its historical traditions stem from the 66th Guards Rifle Division, originally a formation of the Red Army and later of the Soviet Ground Forces.

After 26 October 1999, full name of the Division became 66th Guards Mechanized Bukovyna, Poltava Red Banner Division of the 38th Army Corps of the Western Operational Command of the Armed Forces of Ukraine (Ukrainian: 66 гвардійська механізована Буковинська, Полтавська Червонопрапорна дивізія 38 армійського корпусу Західного оперативного командування Збройних Сил України)[2]

History[edit]

First Formation[edit]

The 293rd Rifle Division was formed on July 18, 1941 from various units of the in Sumy Oblast, Chernivtsi Oblast and Kharkiv Oblast Ukraine.[3] Major General Pavel Lagutin became Division's first commander. On August 24, 1941 the Division was assigned to newly formed 40th Army.[4][5] By early February 1942 the Division was transferred to 21st Army, Southwestern Front[5] and participated in Second Battle of Kharkov.

Remnants of the Division were located near Nizhny Kislyay, Voronezh Oblast by July 8, 1942. Division lost its combat capability. Command and Staff of the 293rd were relocated to the rear, sergeants and privates, weapons, transportation, supplies and 817th Artillery Regiment were transferred to 76th Rifle Division of 21st Army. On August 4, 1941 the 293rd was removed from the 21st Army and moved to Buzuluk[disambiguation needed] by rail where it was included into 4th reserve of the Supreme Commander.

Second Formation[edit]

World War II[edit]

New formation of the 293rd Rifle Division by establishment № 04/300 from July 28, 1942 was finished on October 12, 1942. Division was sent to front and by October 17, 1942 it became part of 21st Army[5] which from October 25, 1942 became part of Southwestern Front where she took part in Operation Uranus.

By Order of the People's Commissariat of Defence of the USSR № 034 from January 21, 1943 the Division was reorganized into 66th Guards Rifle Division. Major General Akim Yakshin became Division's new commander after Pavel Lagutin was promoted to Executive officer of the 21st Army. On February 7, 1943 most of the Divisions units were renamed.

On March 17, 1943 the 66th was assigned to 6th Guards Rifle Corps 1st Guards Army Southwestern Front,[5] from May 5, 1943 the 66th was assigned to 5th Guards Army Steppe Military District. From May 9, 1943 the 66th was with 32nd Guards Rifle Corps 5th Guards Army.[5] During Battle of Kursk and Lower Dnepr strategic offensive operation the 66th was with 33rd Guards Rifle Corps 5th Guards Army, later she was again assigned to 32nd Guards Corps. On September 23, 1943 the 66th was awarded with the honorable name "Poltava" by Supreme Commander. By the end of October the 66th was with 53rd Army, 2nd Ukrainian Front. On November 28, 1943 Major General Sergey Frolov became new Divisions commander, he would remain there until the end of the war. On November 30, 1943 the 66th was with 20th Guards Rifle Corps 4th Guards Army.[5] On January 3, 1944 66th was assigned to 48th Rifle Corps 53rd Army. While taking part in Korsun-Shevchenkovsky Offensive Operation, 66th was with 75th Rifle Corps, later she was assigned to 26th Guards Rifle Corps.

On March 1, 1943 66th was with 69th Army reserve of Stavka[5] near Shpola Cherkasy Oblast. On April 11, 1944 Division was relocated by rail to Zaporizhia with 1st Ukrainian Front. During Lvov-Sandomierz Offensive 66th was with 95th Rifle Corps 18th Army 1st Ukrainian Front.[5] During the East Carpathian Strategic Offensive Operation (the Dnieper–Carpathian Offensive?) the division was assigned to 18th Guards Rifle Corps 18th Army 4th Ukrainian Front.[5] From September 16, 1944, Division also took part in Carpathian-Uzhgorod Offensive Operation.

On November 14, 1944 66th with 18th Guards Rifle Corps was assigned to 2nd Ukrainian Front where she took part in Battle of Budapest. On January 23, 1943 66th was with 104th Rifle Corps 4th Guards Army 3rd Ukrainian Front[5] and took part in Balaton Defensive Operation. On April 5, 1945 the Division was awarded Order of the Red Banner by Supreme Soviet of the USSR. From April 15, 1945 66th was with 21st Guards Rifle Corps 4th Guards Army and took part in Vienna Offensive. Division finished combat operations in Austria on May 8, 1945

1945–1992[edit]

After Victory Day 66th with 27th Army from June 3 to August 23, 1945 was relocating to Ukraine into Carpathian Military District. First base was in Haisyn Vinnytsia Oblast. From October 1946 Division was assigned to 38th Army in Chernivtsi.[3][6] Division took part in Hungarian Revolution of 1956. On June 15, 1957 66th Guards Rifle Division became 66th Guards Motor Rifle Division.

On September 15, 1960, 66th became 66th Guards Training Motor Rifle Division.[7] In 1987, 66th Guards Training Motor Rifle Division became 110th Guards Separate Training Center for junior specialists of motor rifle troops of the Carpathian Military District.[6]

Under Ukrainian control[edit]

Patch of the 22nd Mechanized Brigade

The Training Center became under Ukrainian control after Ukraine declared independence from the Soviet Union.[8] On January 19, 1992 the Training Center along with all other units stationed in Ukraine, pledged their allegiance to Ukrainian people. In May 1992, the 110th Guards Districts Training Center was disbanded by the directive of the Ministry of Defense. On September 1, 1992 a new 66th Mechanized Division started forming on the basis of units from the disbanded Training Center.

A few units from the 17th Guards Motor Rifle Division were added to the Division, when the 17th was reduced to a Brigade. Division was a part of the 38th Army Corps (former 38th Army) Western Operational Command. On October 26, 1999 President of Ukraine awarded the Division with Bukovyna title.[2] On October 30, 2000 all of the honorifics which the Division earned throughout her history were restored. Name of the Division became 66th Guards Bukovyna, Poltava Red Banner Mechanized Division. Soon after, the Division was reformed into the 22nd Mechanized Brigade, all of the Divisions regalia was lost. During 2003 only 300th Mechanized Regiment remained, the rest of the units of the Brigade were disbanded.[1]

Order of battle[edit]

293rd Rifle Division (July 7, 1941)[9][edit]

  • 1032nd Rifle Regiment
  • 1034th Rifle Regiment
  • 1036th Rifle Regiment
  • 817th Artillery Regiment
  • 576th Separate Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion
  • 350th Separate Reconnaissance Battalion
  • 586th Engineer Battalion
  • 571st Separate Signal Battalion
  • 721st Transport Company
  • 319th Medical Battalion
  • 384th Separate Chemical Company
  • 377th Field Bakery
  • 645th Divisions Veterinary Hospital
  • 973rd Field Post Office
  • 859th ПКГБ

293rd Rifle Division (October 12, 1942)[10][edit]

  • 1032nd Rifle Regiment
  • 1034th Rifle Regiment
  • 1036th Rifle Regiment
  • 817th Artillery Regiment
  • 331st Anti-Tank Battalion
  • 586th Separate Engineer Battalion
  • 414th Separate Anti-Aircraft Battery
  • 350th Separate Reconnaissance Company
  • 243rd Separate Supply Company
  • 384th Separate Chemical Company
  • 319th Separate Medical Battalion
  • 420th Transport Company
  • 27th Field Bakery
  • 645th Divisions Veterinary Hospital
  • 973rd Field Post Office
  • 859th ПКГБ
  • Training Rifle Battalion

66th Guards Rifle Division (February 7, 1943 – June 15, 1957)[10][edit]

  • 145th Guards Rifle Regiment
  • 193rd Guards Rifle Regiment
  • 195th Guards Rifle Regiment
  • 135th Guards Artillery Regiment
  • 71st Guards Anti-Tank Battalion
  • 74th Separate Guards Engineer Battalion
  • 81st Guards Separate Anti-Aircraft Battery
  • 67th Separate Guards Reconnaissance Company
  • 94th Separate Guards Supply Company
  • 68th Separate Guards Chemical Company
  • 72nd Separate Medical Battalion
  • 70th Transport Company
  • 64th Field Bakery
  • 65th Divisions Veterinary Hospital
  • 973rd Field Post Office
  • 859th ПКГБ
  • Training Rifle Battalion

66th Guards Motor Rifle Division (June 15, 1957 – September 15, 1960)[edit]

  • 145th Guards Motor Rifle Regiment
  • 193rd Guards Motor Rifle Regiment
  • 195th Guards Motor Rifle Regiment
  • 128th Guards Tank Regiment
  • 358th Separate Signal Battalion
  • 278th Separate Chemical Platoon
  • 495th Separate Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion
  • 101st Separate Reconnaissance Company
  • 358th Separate Guards Signal Company
  • 74th Separate Guards Engineer Battalion

66th Guards Training Motor Rifle Division (September 15, 1960–1987)[edit]

  • 145th Guards Training Motor Rifle Regiment
  • 193rd Guards Training Motor Rifle Regiment – 193rd Motor Rifle Regiment (1961)
  • 195th Guards Training Motor Rifle Regiment
  • 128th Guards Training Tank Regiment
  • 135th Guards Training Artillery Regimen
  • 495th Separate Guards Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion
  • 74th Separate Guards Training Engineer Battalion
  • 179th Separate Guards Training Signal Battalion
  • 81st Separate Training Chemical Battalion – 56th Separate Chemical Company – 524th Separate Training Chemical Battalion (1961) – 247th Separate Chemical Company (1985)
  • 79th Separate Training Medical Battalion
  • 363rd Separate Transport Company
  • 650th Armored Maintenance Depot (until March 1, 1964)
  • 792nd Auto Maintenance Depot (until March 1, 1964)
  • 847th Separate Rocket Battalion (May 1, 1962)
  • 435th Separate Maintenance Battalion (March 1, 1964) – 435th Separate Training Maintenance Battalion (December 1, 1972)
  • 1262nd Separate Training Repair Battalion (1985)

110th Guards Separate Training Center (1987–1992)[11][edit]

  • 145th Guards Training Budapest Motor Rifle Regiment (Chernivtsi)
  • 193rd Guards Training Motor Rifle Regiment (Chernivtsi)
  • 195th Guards Training Motor Rifle Regiment (Chernivtsi)
  • 128th Guards Training Tank Regiment (Storozhynets)
  • 135th Guards Training Artillery Regiment (Chernivtsi)
  • 1292nd Training Anti-Aircraft Artillery Regiment (Chernivtsi)
  • 847th Separate Rocket Battalion (Chernivtsi)
  • 1262nd Separate Training Reconnaissance Battalion (Chernivtsi)
  • 179th Separate Guards Signal Battalion (Chernivtsi)
  • 74th Separate Training Engineer Battalion (Chernivtsi)
  • 79th Separate Medical Battalion
  • 780th Separate Supply Battalion
  • 435th Separate Training Maintenance Battalion

66th Mechanized Division (1992–2000)[edit]

22nd Mechanized Brigade (2000–2003)[12][edit]

Former Commanders[edit]

Honors[edit]

Unit decorations[edit]

Ribbon Award Year Notes
Order of Red Banner ribbon bar.png Order of the Red Banner April 5, 1945 Awarded by Supreme Soviet of the USSR

Honorable Titles[edit]

Image Title Year Notes
Гвардия.png Guards unit January 21, 1943 Awarded by the order People's Commissariat of Defence of the USSR № 034[14]
Poltava September 23, 1943 Awarded by Supreme Commander
Bukovyna October 26, 1999 Awarded by President of Ukraine[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Lubera, Roman (2003-10-31). "Reforms in 22nd Mechanized Brigade are near complition". Doba 81 (352). Retrieved 2008-08-06. 
  2. ^ a b c (Ukrainian) Order of the President № 1392/99
  3. ^ a b (Ukrainian) 47th Anniversary of the 66th Brigade
  4. ^ John Erickson, The Road to Stalingrad, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London, 1975, p.202
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j (Russian) Units of World War II
  6. ^ a b (Russian) Feskov pg. 86
  7. ^ (Russian) Training Divisions
  8. ^ (Russian) Feskov pg.104
  9. ^ (Russian) Units of the 293rd Rifle Division
  10. ^ a b (Russian) List of Divisions renamed during World War II
  11. ^ (Russian) Feskov pg.109
  12. ^ (Russian) Ukrainian Forces on January 1, 2001
  13. ^ (Russian) Akim Yakshin commander of 1243 Rifle Regiment
  14. ^ (Russian) List of People's Commissariat of Defence of the USSR orders for 1943

Bibliography[edit]

  • Slobodianiuk, M. V. (2005). Military Symbols of Ukraine, Rebirth from ashes. Lviv. pp. 54–101. ISBN 966-96313-2-2. [1]
  • Karpov, Victor V.; Tabachnyk, Dmytro V. (2006). Ukrainian Military Symbols. Kyiv: Lybid. pp. 104–106. ISBN 966-06-0453-X. 
  • Feskov, V.I.; Kalashnikov, K.A.; Golikov, V.I. (2004). The Soviet Army in the Years of the Cold War 1945–91. Tomsk: Tomsk University Publishing House. ISBN 5-7511-1819-7. 
  • Lenskiy, A.G.; Tsybin, M.M. (2001). The Soviet Ground Forces in the last years of the USSR. St Petersburg: B&K.