707

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This article is about the year 707. For the number, see 707 (number). For the airplane, see Boeing 707. For other uses, see 707 (disambiguation).
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 7th century8th century9th century
Decades: 670s  680s  690s  – 700s –  710s  720s  730s
Years: 704 705 706707708 709 710
707 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
707 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 707
DCCVII
Ab urbe condita 1460
Armenian calendar 156
ԹՎ ՃԾԶ
Assyrian calendar 5457
Bahá'í calendar −1137 – −1136
Bengali calendar 114
Berber calendar 1657
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1251
Burmese calendar 69
Byzantine calendar 6215–6216
Chinese calendar 丙午(Fire Horse)
3403 or 3343
    — to —
丁未年 (Fire Goat)
3404 or 3344
Coptic calendar 423–424
Discordian calendar 1873
Ethiopian calendar 699–700
Hebrew calendar 4467–4468
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 763–764
 - Shaka Samvat 629–630
 - Kali Yuga 3808–3809
Holocene calendar 10707
Igbo calendar −293 – −292
Iranian calendar 85–86
Islamic calendar 88–89
Japanese calendar Keiun 4
(慶雲4年)
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 707
DCCVII
Korean calendar 3040
Minguo calendar 1205 before ROC
民前1205年
Thai solar calendar 1250
Map of the Arab-Byzantine frontier (8th century)

Year 707 (DCCVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 707 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • July 18 – Emperor Monmu dies after a 10-year reign. He is succeeded by his aunt Genmei who becomes the 43rd empress of Japan. She is the sister of former empress Jitō and, the niece and wife of late emperor Tenmu.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Treadgold, Warren T. (1997), A History of the Byzantine State and Society, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, p. 341, ISBN 0-8047-2630-2 
  2. ^ Venning, Timothy, ed. (2006). A Chronology of the Byzantine Empire. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 191. ISBN 1-4039-1774-4.