710s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 7th century8th century9th century
Decades: 680s 690s 700s710s720s 730s 740s
Years: 710 711 712 713 714 715 716 717 718 719
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

This is a list of events occurring in the 710s, ordered by year.

710[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

  • The Byzantine outpost of Cherson (Crimea) rebels with Khazar assistance against emperor Justinian II. He sends a fleet under the patrikios Stephen, which retakes the city and restores Byzantine control. The fleet however is struck by a storm on its way back and loses many ships, while the Chersonites, again with the aid of the Khazars, rebel anew.[1]
  • The Byzantine general Leo (future emperor Leo III) recovers Abkhazia (Caucasus) for the Byzantine Empire from the Arabs.[2]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Africa[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

711[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

Mesoamerica[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

  • Reconstruction of the Hōryū-ji Temple in Japan is completed (approximate date).

712[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

  • February – King Ansprand dies and is succeeded by his son Liutprand as ruler of the Lombards. During his reign, Liutprand becomes the greatest of the Lombard kings. Coins and documents from his court at Pavia confirm the impression of a strong and effective monarch.[8]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]

713[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

China[edit]

  • Emperor Xuan Zong liquidates the highly lucrative "Inexhaustible Treasury", which is run by a prominent Buddhist monastery in Chang'an. This monastery collects vast amounts of money, silk, and treasures through multitudes of rich people's repentances, left on the premises anonymously. Although the monastery is generous in donations, Xuan Zong issues a decree abolishing their treasury on the grounds that their banking practices were fraudulent, collects their riches, and distributes the wealth to various other Buddhist monasteries, Daoist abbeys, and to repair statues, halls, and bridges in the city.
  • In Chang'an, for the annual Lantern Festival of this year, recently abdicated emperor Rui Zong erects an enormous lantern wheel at a city gate, with a recorded height of 200 ft. The frame is draped in brocades and silk gauze, adorned with gold and jade jewelry, and when its total of some 50,000 oil cups is lit the radiance of it can be seen for miles.
  • Xuan Zong allots the money of 20 million copper coins and assigns about 1,000 craftsmen to construct a hall at a Buddhist monastery with tons of painted portraits of himself, and of deities, ghosts, etc.
  • Xuan Zong wins a power struggle with his sister, princess Taiping. He executes a large number of her allies and forcing her to commit suicide.

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]

Religion[edit]


714[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

China[edit]

  • Emperor Xuan Zong forbids all commercial vendors and shops in the Chinese capital city of Chang'an to copy and sell Buddhist sutras, so that the emperor can give the clergy of the Buddhist monasteries the sole right to distribute written sutras to the laity.
  • Summer – Xuan Zong makes his general Xue Ne chancellor de facto and commissions him with an Chinese army (60,000 men) to attack the Khitans (Mongolia). Xue falls into a Khitan trap and the Tang forces are crushed, at an 80-90% casualty rate.
  • Fall – Xue Ne repels a Tibetan invasion who attack the Lan Prefecture (modern Lanzhou). Xuan Zong creates Li Ying, his second son, crown prince of the Tang Dynasty.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

715[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Japan[edit]

  • Empress Genmei abdicates the throne after a 8-year reign in which she has built a replica of the Chinese imperial palace at Japan's new capital, Nara. Genmei is succeeded by her daughter Genshō.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

716[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

717[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

718[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

719[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Treadgold, Warren T. (1997). A History of the Byzantine State and Society. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. p. 341. ISBN 0-8047-2630-2. 
  2. ^ Venning, Timothy, ed. (2006). A Chronology of the Byzantine Empire. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 192. ISBN 1-4039-1774-4. 
  3. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  4. ^ Swanton, Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, pp 42–43
  5. ^ According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  6. ^ Alexander Berzin, Part I: The Umayyad Caliphate (661 - 750 CE), "The First Muslim Incursion into the Indian Subcontinent". The Historical Interaction between the Buddhist and Islamic Cultures before the Mongol Empire Last accessed. September 11, 2007.
  7. ^ Wink (2004), pp 201–205
  8. ^ Lombard (people), Encyclopaedia Britannica
  9. ^ Spencer C. Tucker (2010). A Global Chronology of Conflict: From the Ancient World to the Modern Middle (p. 208). ISBN 978-1-85109-667-1
  10. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  11. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  12. ^ "Geschiedenis van het volk der Friezen". Boudicca.de. Retrieved 2009-01-22. 
  13. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 21). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  14. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "Pope St. Gregory II". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  15. ^ Dobie, p. 255
  16. ^ Ehrenfeld, Rachel (2005-12-19). "Islam’s Religious Intolerance". Frontpagemag.com. Retrieved 2012-08-15. 
  17. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr (1991). "The Early Medieval Balkans". A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century. Chapter 3: "The Balkans in the Eighth Century". Tervel and Byzantium (p. 75). ISBN 978-0472-08149-3
  18. ^ Bede, p. 324, translated by Leo Sherley-Price
  19. ^ Provencal, Levi. Encyclopedia of Islam New Edition Vol. 1 A-B. (Leiden, Netherlands: E.J. Brill, 1960), p. 58
  20. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  21. ^ Book of Tang, Vol. 194-I
  22. ^ Kaegi (1994), pp. 186, 195
  23. ^ Bellinger & Grierson (1992), p. 5
  24. ^ Jenkins, Romilly (1966). Byzantium: The Imperial centuries AD 610–1071, p. 56
  25. ^ John Cairns, "Road to Manzikert" (2012). Byzantine Warfare in an Age of Crisis and Recovery (Chapter 3), p. 69. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1
  26. ^ John Cairns, "Road to Manzikert" (2012). Byzantine Warfare in an Age of Crisis and Recovery (Chapter 3), p. 70. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1
  27. ^ Guilland 1959, p. 122; Mango & Scott 1997, p. 546; Lilie 1976, pp. 130–131; Treadgold 1997, p. 348
  28. ^ Treadgold (1997), pp. 347–349
  29. ^ Haldon 1990, p. 83
  30. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  31. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  32. ^ Halbertsma, Herrius (1982). "Summary". Frieslands Oudheid (Thesis) (in Dutch with English summary). Groningen: Rijksuniversiteit Groningen. pp. 791–798. OCLC 746889526.