718

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This article is about the year 718. For the number, see 718 (number).
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 7th century8th century9th century
Decades: 680s  690s  700s  – 710s –  720s  730s  740s
Years: 715 716 717718719 720 721
718 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
718 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 718
DCCXVIII
Ab urbe condita 1471
Armenian calendar 167
ԹՎ ՃԿԷ
Assyrian calendar 5468
Bahá'í calendar −1126 – −1125
Bengali calendar 125
Berber calendar 1668
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1262
Burmese calendar 80
Byzantine calendar 6226–6227
Chinese calendar 丁巳(Fire Snake)
3414 or 3354
    — to —
戊午年 (Earth Horse)
3415 or 3355
Coptic calendar 434–435
Discordian calendar 1884
Ethiopian calendar 710–711
Hebrew calendar 4478–4479
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 774–775
 - Shaka Samvat 640–641
 - Kali Yuga 3819–3820
Holocene calendar 10718
Igbo calendar −282 – −281
Iranian calendar 96–97
Islamic calendar 99–100
Japanese calendar Yōrō 2
(養老2年)
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 718
DCCXVIII
Korean calendar 3051
Minguo calendar 1194 before ROC
民前1194年
Thai solar calendar 1261
King Pelagius (Don Pelayo) (c. 685–737)

Year 718 (DCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 718 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John Cairns, "Road to Manzikert" (2012). Byzantine Warfare in an Age of Crisis and Recovery (Chapter 3), p. 70. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1
  2. ^ Guilland 1959, p. 122; Mango & Scott 1997, p. 546; Lilie 1976, pp. 130–131; Treadgold 1997, p. 348
  3. ^ Treadgold (1997), pp. 347–349
  4. ^ Haldon 1990, p. 83
  5. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 17). ISBN 978-184603-230-1