735

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article is about the year 735. For the number, see 735 (number).
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 7th century8th century9th century
Decades: 700s  710s  720s  – 730s –  740s  750s  760s
Years: 732 733 734735736 737 738
735 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
735 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 735
DCCXXXV
Ab urbe condita 1488
Armenian calendar 184
ԹՎ ՃՁԴ
Assyrian calendar 5485
Bahá'í calendar −1109 – −1108
Bengali calendar 142
Berber calendar 1685
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1279
Burmese calendar 97
Byzantine calendar 6243–6244
Chinese calendar 甲戌(Wood Dog)
3431 or 3371
    — to —
乙亥年 (Wood Pig)
3432 or 3372
Coptic calendar 451–452
Discordian calendar 1901
Ethiopian calendar 727–728
Hebrew calendar 4495–4496
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 791–792
 - Shaka Samvat 657–658
 - Kali Yuga 3836–3837
Holocene calendar 10735
Igbo calendar −265 – −264
Iranian calendar 113–114
Islamic calendar 116–117
Japanese calendar Tenpyō 7
(天平7年)
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 735
DCCXXXV
Korean calendar 3068
Minguo calendar 1177 before ROC
民前1177年
Thai solar calendar 1278
Bede (the "Venerable") translates John

Year 735 (DCCXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 735 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pierre Riche, The Carolingians: A family who forged Europe, Transl. Michael Idomir Allen, (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993), p. 44
  2. ^ Golden, Peter B. (2010). Turks and Khazars: origins, institutions, and interactions in pre-Mongol Eurasia. Farnham, England: Ashgate/Variorum. ISBN 978-1-4094-0003-5. 
  3. ^ Mayr-Harting, "Ecgberht (d. 766)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography