741

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This article is about the year 741. For the number, see 741 (number). For the integrated circuit, see operational amplifier. For other uses, see 741 (disambiguation).
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 7th century8th century9th century
Decades: 710s  720s  730s  – 740s –  750s  760s  770s
Years: 738 739 740741742 743 744
741 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
741 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 741
DCCXLI
Ab urbe condita 1494
Armenian calendar 190
ԹՎ ՃՂ
Assyrian calendar 5491
Bahá'í calendar −1103 – −1102
Bengali calendar 148
Berber calendar 1691
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1285
Burmese calendar 103
Byzantine calendar 6249–6250
Chinese calendar 庚辰(Metal Dragon)
3437 or 3377
    — to —
辛巳年 (Metal Snake)
3438 or 3378
Coptic calendar 457–458
Discordian calendar 1907
Ethiopian calendar 733–734
Hebrew calendar 4501–4502
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 797–798
 - Shaka Samvat 663–664
 - Kali Yuga 3842–3843
Holocene calendar 10741
Igbo calendar −259 – −258
Iranian calendar 119–120
Islamic calendar 123–124
Japanese calendar Tenpyō 13
(天平13年)
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 741
DCCXLI
Korean calendar 3074
Minguo calendar 1171 before ROC
民前1171年
Thai solar calendar 1284
Statue of Charles Martel (c. 688–741)

Year 741 (DCCXLI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 741 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Switzerland[edit]

Africa[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Settipani 1989.
  2. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; pp. 25
  3. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg Horace K. Mann (1913). "Pope St. Gregory III". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.