800 mm gauge railways

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Track gauges
By transport mode
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By size (list)
Graphic list of track gauges

Minimum
  Fifteen inch 381 mm (15 in)

Narrow
  Two foot and
600 mm
597 mm
600 mm
603 mm
610 mm
(1 ft 11 12 in)
(1 ft 11 58 in)
(1 ft 11 34 in)
(2 ft)
  750 mm,
Bosnian,
Two foot six inch,
800 mm
750 mm
760 mm
762 mm
800 mm
(2 ft 5 12 in)
(2 ft 5 1516 in)
(2 ft 6 in)
(2 ft 7 12 in)
  Swedish three foot,
900 mm,
Three foot
891 mm
900 mm
914 mm
(2 ft11 332 in)
(2 ft 11 716)
(3 ft)
  Metre 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in)
  Three foot six inch,
Cape, CAP, Kyōki
1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
  Four foot six inch 1,372 mm (4 ft 6 in)

  Standard 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)

Broad
  Russian,
Five foot
1,520 mm
1,524 mm
(4 ft 11 2732 in)
(5 ft)
  Irish 1,600 mm (5 ft 3 in)
  Iberian 1,668 mm (5 ft 5 2132 in)
  Indian 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in)
  Brunel 2,140 mm (7 ft 14 in)
Change of gauge
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Conversion (list· Bogie exchange · Variable gauge
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World map, rail gauge by region

800mm gauge railways are narrow gauge railways built to a track gauge of 800 mm (2 ft 7 12 in).

Whilst this gauge is uncommon amongst adhesion railways, some of the world's best known rack railways are built to it. Six of these are in Switzerland, including the world's steepest rack line (the Pilatus Railway) and the world's longest pure rack line (the Wengernalp Railway), whilst the United Kingdom's only rack railway (the Snowdon Mountain Railway) is also to this gauge. A few funicular railways are also built to this gauge.[1][2][3][4]

Installations[edit]

Country/territory Railway
Germany
Japan
Norway
Poland
Romania
Switzerland
United Kingdom

References[edit]

  1. ^ "World's steepest cogwheel railway". Pilatus Bahnen. Retrieved 2014-05-21. 
  2. ^ "WAB - die längste Zahnradbahn" [WAB - the longest cog railway]. Jungfraubahn. Retrieved 2014-05-25. 
  3. ^ "Snowdon Mountain Railway". AboutBritain.com. Retrieved 2014-05-21. 
  4. ^ "DPB - Davos Parsenn Bahn". Funimag. Retrieved 2014-05-21. 
  5. ^ "Eisenerzbergbau in Braunfels - Die Braunfelser Ernstbahn - Geschichte einer besonderen Kleinbahn" (in German). Stadt Braunfels. Retrieved 2014-05-21.