82nd Aviation Regiment

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82nd Combat Aviation Brigade
82AvnRegtCOA.jpg
coat of arms
Active 1957
Country USA
Branch United States Army Aviation Branch
Type Aviation
Motto GROUND AIR MOBILITY
Colors Ultramarine Blue, Golden orange
Insignia
Distinctive Unit Insignia 82AvnRegtDUI.jpg
Aircraft flown
Attack helicopter AH-64
Cargo helicopter CH-47
Multirole helicopter UH-60
Observation helicopter OH-58
Utility helicopter UH-60
Reconnaissance AH-64

The 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade is an aviation brigade of the U.S. Army.

History[edit]

Lineage[edit]

Constituted 1 September 1957 in the Regular Army as the 82nd Aviation Company, assigned to the 82d Airborne Division, and activated at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Reorganized and redesignated 7 December 1962 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 82nd Aviation Battalion (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated).

Relieved 15 January 1987 from assignment to the 82d Airborne Division; concurrently reorganized and redesignated as the 82d Aviation, a parent regiment under the United States Army Regimental System.

Distinctive Unit Insignia[edit]

  • Description

A Silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Checky Azure and Argent, a chess knight in profile Sable between two wings displayed inverted Or. Attached below the shield is a Silver scroll inscribed "GROUND AIR MOBILITY" in Black letters.

  • Symbolism

Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors used for Aviation. The checky field represents a chess board, symbolic of the battlefield, and refers to the strategy of war. The knight, considered the most versatile piece to guard and aid the queen, placed between wings, symbolizes the mission of the unit and its versatility.

  • Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 82d Aviation Battalion on 8 February 1963. It was amended to change the color of the shield on 26 August 1981. The insignia was redesignated for the 82d Aviation Regiment with the description amended on 27 February 1987.

Coat Of Arms[edit]

Blazon[edit]

  • Shield

Checky Azure and Argent, a chess knight in profile Sable between two wings displayed inverted Or.

  • Crest

From a wreath Argent and Azure, between two palm fronds Vert a pheon Or superimposed by a sword of the first hilted Gules. Motto GROUND AIR MOBILITY.

  • Symbolism
  • Shield

Ultramarine blue and golden orange are the colors used for Aviation. The checky field represents a chess board, symbolic of the battlefield, and refers to the strategy of war. The knight, considered the most versatile piece to guard and aid the queen, placed between wings, symbolizes the missions of the unit and its versatility.

  • Crest

The unit's campaign participation in Grenada is commemorated by the colors of the design elements (yellow, red and green) adapted from the flag of Grenada. The pheon alludes to attack capabilities, swiftness and accuracy in flight. The unsheathed sword symbolizes military preparedness and combat service. The red color of the hilt honors the organization's Meritorious Unit Commendation earned in Southwest Asia. The palm fronds represent victory and their two Southwest Asia campaigns: Defense of Saudi Arabia and the Liberation and Defense of Kuwait.

  • Background

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 82d Aviation Battalion on 8 February 1963. It was amended to change the color of the shield on 26 August 1981. It was redesignated for the 82d Aviation Regiment on 27 February 1987. The coat of arms was amended to include a crest on 7 August 2003.

Current configuration[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Army Institute of Heraldry document "82nd Aviation Regiment".

  • Historical register and dictionary of the United States Army, from ..., Volume 1 By Francis Bernard Heitman [1]
  • Encyclopedia of United States Army insignia and uniforms By William K. Emerson (page 51).[2]

External links[edit]