84 Klio

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84 Klio
Discovery
Discovered by Karl Theodor Robert Luther
Discovery date August 25, 1865
Designations
Named after
Clio
 
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 436.886 Gm (2.920 AU)
Perihelion 269.828 Gm (1.804 AU)
353.357 Gm (2.362 AU)
Eccentricity 0.236
1325.961 d (3.63 a)
19.11 km/s
326.072°
Inclination 9.334°
327.651°
14.690°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 79.16 km[1]
Mass (5.47 ± 4.06) × 1017[2] kg
Mean density
2.08 ± 1.55[2] g/cm3
0.0221 m/s²
0.0419 km/s
23.562[1][3]
Albedo 0.053[1][4]
Temperature ~181 K
Spectral type
G[1]
9.32[1]

84 Klio (/ˈkl./ KLY-oh) is a quite large and very dark main-belt asteroid. It was discovered by R. Luther on August 25, 1865, and named after Clio, the Muse of history in Greek mythology. The name Clio had previously been suggested by the discoverer of 12 Victoria, and that is the name B. A. Gould, editor of the prestigious Astronomical Journal, adopted for that asteroid, because of the controversy over the name Victoria. An occultation by Klio over a dim star was observed on April 2, 1997.

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 2007 at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico were used to create a light curve plot. This showed a synodic rotation period of 23.562 ± 0.001 hours and a brightness variation of 0.21 ± 0.02 magnitude during each cycle.[3]

Perturbation[edit]

Perturbations of asteroid 52 Europa by 84 Klio suggest that 52 Europa would have a mass as high as 1.68×1020 kg.[5][6] But this would require Europa to have an unrealistic density of 10.6 g/cm³.[5] Further observations of Klio will be needed to properly refine the mass of both asteroid Europa and Klio.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 84 Klio". 2008-03-30 last obs. Retrieved 2008-11-06. 
  2. ^ a b Carry, B. (December 2012). "Density of asteroids". Planetary and Space Science 73: 98–118. arXiv:1203.4336. Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (June 2008). "Period Determination for 84 Klio, 98 Ianthe, 102 Miriam 112 Iphigenia, 131 Vala, and 650 Amalasuntha". Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers 35 (2): 71–72. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...71P. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. 
  4. ^ Asteroid Data Sets
  5. ^ a b Michalak, G. (2001). "Determination of asteroid masses". Astronomy & Astrophysics 374 (2): 703–711. Bibcode:2001A&A...374..703M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20010731. Retrieved 2008-11-06. 
  6. ^ (High estimate for mass of asteroid Europa 0.851 / Mass of Ceres 4.75) * Mass of Ceres 9.43E+20 = 1.689E+20