870s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 8th century9th century10th century
Decades: 840s 850s 860s870s880s 890s 900s
Years: 870 871 872 873 874 875 876 877 878 879
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

This is a list of events occurring in the 870s, ordered by year.

870[edit]

By place[edit]

Abbasid Caliphate[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

871[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

872[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Africa[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

873[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • A widespread failure of the agricultural harvest in Tang Dynasty China leads to an equally widespread famine; in the previous century the central government was able to curb famine with large grain stores, but this time the central government is already in decline and too weak to properly face the disaster.


874[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

875[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • In Champa, in the central region of modern-day Vietnam, King Indravarman II founds a new dynasty at Indrapura (Quảng Nam) and initiates a building program featuring the Dong Duong Style of Cham art.

Africa[edit]

876[edit]

877[edit]

By place[edit]

Asia[edit]

Europe[edit]

  • The Danes take Exeter, England.
  • A flotilla of 120 Danish ships is lost in a storm off Swanage.[7]
  • Áed Whitefoot succeeds Constantine I of Scotland.
  • Pope John VIII requests the help of Charles the Bald, King of West Francia, against attacks by the Saracens in Italy.
  • June – Charles sets out for Italy, accompanied by his wife Richilda and only a small number of his chief vassals. Orders are issued for an army to be assembled to join him a little later. Pope John VIII receives Charles at Vercelli. But at the same time Carloman, king of Bavaria and the East Mark, has also crossed the Alps into eastern Lombardy at the head of a powerful army. Charles hurries on the coronation of Richilda as Empress and sends her back to Gaul with orders for the reinforcements to hurry. However, the Frankish aristocracy is more concerned with the attacks by the Northmen in their country than the war with the Saracens in southern Italy. When the reinforcements do not arrive, Charles the Bald is compelled to return to West Francia. But on the road he dies in a poor hovel. It is said that he was poisoned by his Jewish doctor Zedekiah. Carloman of Bavaria, forced by an epidemic which broke out in his army, returns to Germany. When Louis the Stammerer receives news of the death of his father, Charles the Bald, he makes plans to go into West Francia to receive the oath of fidelity from his new subjects. On his way he learns that the magnates are refusing him obedience by rallying around Boso and the Abbot Hugh. The rebels are supported by his stepmother, the widowed Empress Richilda, and, as a sign of their displeasure, ravage the country. Boso is the brother of Richilda and duke of Provence. Hugh had been given the Abbey of Saint-Bertin by Louis’ father. Hincmar, Archbishop of Rheims, intercedes and the rebels agree to a settlement. The magnates, whose rights the king promises to recognize, all make their submissions.
  • December 8 – Hincmar crowns Louis the Stammerer King of the West Franks in the church of Compiegne.

878[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

879[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rucquoi, Adeline (1993). Histoire médiévale de la Péninsule ibérique. Paris: Seuil. p. 85. ISBN 2-02-012935-3. 
  2. ^ "Islamic Culture and the Medical Arts _ Hospitals". Retrieved 8 November 2011. 
  3. ^ Stratton, J.M. (1969). Agricultural Records. John Baker. ISBN 0-212-97022-4. 
  4. ^ Bruce, George (1981). Harbottle's Dictionary of Battles. Van Nostrand Reinhold. ISBN 0442223366. 
  5. ^ Annals of Ulster.
  6. ^ Annales Cambriae.
  7. ^ Stratton, J.M. (1969). Agricultural Records. John Baker. ISBN 0-212-97022-4. 
  8. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle0. L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 109. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9.