89th Street (Manhattan)

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89th Street
Soldiers Sailors dusk jeh.jpg
The Soldier's and Sailor's Monument
Location Manhattan
Rice Mansion, now Yeshiva Ketana
Houses on West 89th St

89th Street runs from Riverside Drive, overlooking the Hudson River, to the East River, through the New York City borough of Manhattan. The street is interrupted by Central Park. It runs through the Upper West Side, Carnegie Hill and Yorkville neighborhoods.

The street begins on Riverside Drive overlooking Riverside Park and the Hudson River at the site of the magnificent, Classical, marble Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument.

The first building on the north side of the street at its western end is the Henry Codman Potter house, one of the few remaining mansions on Riverside Drive; it houses Yeshiva Chofetz Chaim. On the south side of the street stands the former Isaac Rice mansion, now Yeshiva Ketana of Manhattan and a designated New York City Landmark.

The Dalton School, the Dwight School, and the Abraham Joshua Heschel School are all located on 89th Street.

The block between Amsterdam Avenue and Columbus Avenue has the old Claremont Riding Academy, now an extension of the Gaynor School, the West Side Community Garden and the magnificently restored 1890's Public School 166, a much admired Collegiate Gothic building in glazed terra cotta.[1]

The block between Columbus Ave. and Central Park is tree-shaded and lined with beautiful restored town houses. The corner of Central Park West is marked by The St. Urban, an apartment building "splendidly crowned by dome and cupola".[2]

To the east of Central Park, the street passes the 89th street facade of the National Academy of Design in a block of handsome town houses. Between Madison Avenue and Park Avenue is a handsome gothic Revival church, built by the Episcopalians in 1870, it became a Reformed Church and is now the Roman Catholic Church of St. Thomas More.[3] The block between Lexington Avenue and Third Avenue has a row of "spectacularly romantic" Queen Anne style town houses.[4]

The street ends at Carl Schurz Park on the East River.

References[edit]

  1. ^ White, Norval & Willensky, Elliot (2000). AIA Guide to New York City (4th ed.). New York: Three Rivers Press. ISBN 978-0-8129-3107-5. , p.350.
  2. ^ White, Norval & Willensky, Elliot (2000). AIA Guide to New York City (4th ed.). New York: Three Rivers Press. ISBN 978-0-8129-3107-5. , p.363.
  3. ^ White, Norval & Willensky, Elliot (2000). AIA Guide to New York City (4th ed.). New York: Three Rivers Press. ISBN 978-0-8129-3107-5. , p.428
  4. ^ White, Norval & Willensky, Elliot (2000). AIA Guide to New York City (4th ed.). New York: Three Rivers Press. ISBN 978-0-8129-3107-5. , p.456

Coordinates: 40°47′00″N 73°57′31″W / 40.7833°N 73.9586°W / 40.7833; -73.9586