8 cm minomet vz. 36

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
8 cm minomet vz. 36
Type medium mortar
Place of origin Czechslovakia
Service history
In service 1936-1945
Used by Czechslovakia
Nazi Germany
Slovakia
Wars World War II
Production history
Designer Škoda Works
Manufacturer Škoda Works
Produced 1936—39?
Specifications
Weight 62 kilograms (137 lb)
Barrel length 1,165 millimetres (45.9 in)

Shell weight 3.265 kilograms (7.20 lb) (light bomb)
6.85 kilograms (15.1 lb) (heavy bomb)
Caliber 81.3 millimetres (3.20 in)
Elevation +40° to +80°
Traverse 10°
Muzzle velocity 220 metres per second (720 ft/s)
Effective firing range 1,200 metres (1,300 yd) (heavy bomb)
Maximum firing range 3,400 metres (3,700 yd) (light bomb)

The 8 cm minomet vz. 36 (mortar model 36) was a medium mortar designed by the Škoda Works during the Thirties. Intended as standard medium infantry mortar for the Czechoslovak Army all available weapons were impressed into service by the German Army when they occupied Bohemia-Moravia in March 1939 and the Slovaks seized approximately one hundred fifty when they declared independence from Czechoslovakia at the same time. Slovak weapons saw combat in the Slovak-Hungarian War, the invasion of Poland, the opening months of Operation Barbarossa and the Slovak National Uprising.

Design[edit]

The 8 cm minomet vz. 36 was a close copy of the French Brandt series of mortars. While it differed in details the most important thing was that its ammunition was incompatible with the Brandt mortars. It fired two different mortar bombs, a light 3.265 kilograms (7.20 lb) bomb to a range of 3,400 metres (3,700 yd) and a heavy 6.85 kilograms (15.1 lb) bomb to 1,200 metres (1,300 yd). It broke down into three loads, barrel, baseplate and tripod, for transport. Normally one man carried each piece.[1]

Operational use[edit]

Approximately 900 were in Czechoslovak service in September 1938.[2]

Nothing specific is known about German use although it likely saw service mostly with 2nd-line and reserve troops.

Slovakia seized approximately one hundred fifty when they declared independence from Czechoslovakia in March 1939. They were used as the standard medium infantry mortar for the duration of the war. They saw combat in the Slovak-Hungarian War, the invasion of Poland, the opening months of Operation Barbarossa and the Slovak National Uprising.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Gander and Chamberlain, p. 307
  2. ^ Šrámek, Pavel; Pavel Minařík (1999). "Zabezpečení válečné armády výzbrojí, technikou a materiálem Pavel Šrámek - Pavel Minařík". Sborník vojenské akademie v Brně (in Czech). Archived from the original on 14 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-25. 
  3. ^ Kliment and Naklàdal, p. 120

References[edit]

  • Gander, Terry; Chamberlain, Peter (1979). Weapons of the Third Reich: An Encyclopedic Survey of All Small Arms, Artillery and Special Weapons of the German Land Forces 1939-1945. New York: Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-15090-3. 
  • * Kliment, Charles K.; Nakládal, Bretislav (1997). Germany's First Ally: Armed Forces of the Slovak State 1939—1945. Atglen, PA: Schiffer. ISBN 0-7643-0589-1.