8-inch Gun M1

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8 inch Gun M-1
8CanLeftFront.jpg
8 inch Gun at the U.S. Army Field Artillery Museum, Fort Sill, OK
Type Heavy gun
Place of origin United States
Service history
Used by United States
United Kingdom
Wars World War II
Production history
Designed 1940–1944
Produced 1944–?
Specifications
Weight Combat: 69,300 lb (31,400 kg)
Barrel length 33 ft 4 in (10.16 m) L/50

Shell separate-loading, bag charge
Caliber 203 mm (8.0 in)
Breech interrupted screw
Recoil hydropneumatic
Carriage split trail
Elevation +10° to +50°
Traverse 30° (initially), post-war 40°
Muzzle velocity 2,840 ft/s (870 m/s)
Effective firing range 12.5 mi (20.1 km) (minimum)
Maximum firing range 20.24 mi (32.57 km)

The 8 inch Gun M-1 was a 203 mm towed heavy gun developed in the United States. It was used by the US Army and the British Army in World War II.

Development[edit]

Serious development began in June 1940 of an 8-inch (200 mm) gun that would have a range of 33,500 yards (30,600 m), a road speed of 25 mph (40 km/h), be transported in 2 loads weighing no more than 44,000 lb (20,000 kg) and be suitable for rail movement. Use of the carriage of the 240 mm howitzer M1 eased development, but the gun was very troublesome and wasn't standardized until January 1944. The main problems were excessive bore wear and poor accuracy, but it was felt that nothing better could be produced in a timely manner. Thus it entered production at a low rate and in small numbers.
Like the 240 mm howitzer, it was mounted on a stretched Heavy Tank T26E3 chassis that had an extra bogie wheel per side as the 8in Gun Motor Carriage T93, but the war ended before they could be used and were later scrapped.

An 8 inch US Army field gun in action during the bombardment of Brest.

Transport[edit]

It also shared transport wagons with the 240 mm howitzer. One six-wheeled wagon carried the M2 carriage and the other carried the barrel as shown below: This separate configuration required the use of the M2 truck mounted crane for set up.

Barrel of the M1 prepared for transportation, on display in the US Army Ordnance Museum

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Hogg, Ian V. (1998). Allied Artillery of World War Two. Greenhill Books. ISBN 1-85367-478-8. 
  • Hogg, Ian V. The Guns, 1939-45. New York: Ballantine Books, 1970 ISBN 0019067100
  • TM 9-2300 Standard Artillery and fire Control Material. (dated February 1944)
  • TM 9-336

External links[edit]