92nd Coast Artillery (United States)

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92nd Coast Artillery
92 ADA COA.png
Coat of arms
Active 1924-1942
Country  United States
Branch Army
Type Coast artillery
Garrison/HQ Fort Mills
Motto "Always Ready"
Colors Scarlet
Mascot Oozlefinch
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Colonel Octave De Carre

The 92nd Coast Artillery Regiment was a Regular Coast Artillery regiment in the United States Army, and part of the Philippine Scouts.

History[edit]

The regiment was constituted February 1924 as 92nd CA (HD) Regt (PS) and organized 7-1-24 at Fort Mills by redesignating 278th, 280th, 283rd, 287th, 288th, 275th, & 289th Cos, (PS)(organized 12-18-22) as HHB and Btrys A-F.[1] During the Philippines Campaign (1941–42) the regiment was equipped primarily with Canon de 155mm GPF tractor drawn guns. It manned the following batteries.

  • A Battery (Fort Wint) Beach defense
  • B Battery
  • C Battery Kysor
  • D Battery Levagood
  • E Battery Ordnance Point
  • F Battery Frank North
  • G Battery Monja

1st Bn (Btrys A & B), 2nd Bn (Btrys C & D), manned fixed and mobile seacoast guns. 3rd Bn (Bilibid Guard Bn) provided guard for the post stockade and guard details for Bilibid convict work gangs on Corregidor and other fortified islands. Redesignated TD regiment 1935. Btrys G and H activated 4-28-41 at Ft. Mills and regiment reorganized. The 1st Bn composed of Btrys A-D; 2nd Bn composed of Btrys E & F (Guard Bn) and 3rd Bn to be composed of Btrys G & H. Organization of Btry H not complete when World War II started and personnel merged into other components of regiment. Regiment surrendered 5-6-42 after the end of the Battle of Corregidor, disbanded 6-28-50.

Distinctive unit insignia[edit]

  • Description

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 14 inches (3.2 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules, a 155-mm gun with carriage Proper between three mullets Or. Above the shield from a wreath Or and Gules, a cockatrice Or, armed, jalloped and crested Gules. Attached below the shield a Red scroll inscribed “ALWAYS READY” in Gold letters.

  • Symbolism

The shield is red for Artillery. The gun represents the arm or weapon, and the three mullets are taken from the Philippine flag. The unit being allocated to the Philippine Islands, uses a cockatrice for a crest. Corregidor Island is symbolized by a fighting cock; the island is surrounded by the China Sea, and China is usually symbolized by a dragon; therefore, the cockatrice - half cock and half dragon - is symbolic of the location of the organization in the Philippines.

  • Background

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 10 December 1937. It was rescinded/canceled on 14 March 1975.

Coat of arms[edit]

  • Blazon
    • Shield: Gules, a 155-mm gun with carriage Proper between three mullets Or.
    • Crest: On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules, a cockatrice Or, armed, jalloped and crested Gules.
    • Motto: ALWAYS READY.
  • Symbolism
    • Shield: The shield is red for Artillery. The gun represents the arm or weapon, and the three mullets are taken from the Philippine flag.
    • Crest: The unit being allocated to the Philippine Islands, uses a cockatrice for a crest. Corregidor Island is symbolized by a fighting cock; the island is surrounded by the China Sea, and China is usually symbolized by a dragon; therefore, the cockatrice - half cock and half dragon - is symbolic of the location of the organization in the Philippines.
  • Background: The coat of arms was approved on 22 March 1927. It was rescinded/canceled on 14 March 1975.

Decorations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.cdsg.org/reprint%20PDFs/CACreg1.pdf

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Army Institute of Heraldry document "92nd Coast Artillery Regiment".

External links[edit]