92nd Training Centre (Ukraine)

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The 92nd Training Centre was a formation of the Ukrainian Ground Forces, that drew most of its history from the 92nd Guards Rifle Division, that became the 92nd Guards Motor Rifle Division around 1957 or 1965.

The 92nd Guards Rifle Division was formed in March 1943 in Kupyansk from the soldiers of the 149th and 12th Guards Rifle Brigades involved in the Battle of Stalingrad. 93rd Rifle Brigade was established in September 1942 in the Urals. Became 12th Guards Rifle Brigade, then in April 1943, 92nd Guards RD.[1]

In the summer of 1943 fighters division participated in the battles in Prokhorovka, then at Kharkov, Poltava, Ascension, Pervomaisk.

On 1 September 1943 the division was part of the 57th Rifle Corps. The corps comprised the 62nd Guards, 92nd Guards, 110th Guards, and 53rd Rifle Divisions. It was part of the 37th Army, STAVKA Reserve.

In 1943 the division liberated Krivoy Rog, for which the division was named Krivorozhskaya. Crossed the River Dnieper near the village of Mishurin Horn. Soon the division was awarded the Order of the Red Banner.

Fought in Moldavia, and Iasi in Romania. With 37th Army in Bulgaria May 1945. 48 fighters of the division were awarded the title of Hero of the Soviet Union.

In 1946, the division was relocated to the city of Nikolaev, Odessa Military District. Became 34th Guards Mechanised Division postwar, 34th Guards Motor Rifle Division 1957, and 92nd Guards Motor Rifle Division 1965.[2] Around 1988, it became the 150th District Training Centre.

After the Soviet collapse, the division became part of the Ukrainian Armed Forces. Later it was redesignated the 92nd Training Centre of the Southern Operational Command (92 УЦ ЮОК).

Composition[edit]

276th Guards Rifle Regiment 280th Guards Rifle Regiment 282nd Guards Rifle Regiment 197th Guards Artillery Regiment

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Red Banner from Ural", Military Publishing, 1983, p. 137, via Lenskii 2001.
  2. ^ Feskov et al 2004.

External links[edit]


This article incorporates information from this version of the equivalent article on the Russian Wikipedia.