94 Aurora

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Not to be confused with Aurora borealis.
94 Aurora
94Aurora (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 94 Aurora based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by James Craig Watson
Discovery date September 6, 1867
Designations
Pronunciation /əˈrɔərə/
Named after
Aurōra
 
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 513.851 Gm (3.435 AU)
Perihelion 431.319 Gm (2.883 AU)
472.585 Gm (3.159 AU)
Eccentricity 0.087
2050.831 d (5.61 a)
16.73 km/s
239.694°
Inclination 7.966°
2.709°
59.814°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 225×173km[2]
204.9 ± 3.6 km (IRAS)[1]
Mass (6.23 ± 3.64) × 1018[3] kg
Mean density
1.83 ± 1.10[3] g/cm3
0.0573 m/s²
0.1083 km/s
7.22 h[1]
Albedo 0.0395[1][4]
Temperature ~157 K
Spectral type
C[1]
7.57[1]

94 Aurora is one of the largest main-belt asteroids. With an albedo of only 0.04, it is darker than soot, and has a primitive compositions consisting of carbonaecous material. It was discovered by J. C. Watson on September 6, 1867, in Ann Arbor, and named after Aurora, the Roman goddess of the dawn.

Observations of an occultation using nine chords indicate an oval outline of 225×173 km.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 94 Aurora" (2008-11-09 last obs). Retrieved 2008-12-01. 
  2. ^ a b "Occultation of TYC 6910-01938-1 by (94) Aurora - 2001 October 12". Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand. Retrieved 2008-11-30.  (Chords)
  3. ^ a b Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73: 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  4. ^ Asteroid Data Sets