98 Ianthe

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98 Ianthe
Discovery
Discovered by Christian Heinrich Friedrich Peters
Discovery date April 18, 1868
Designations
Named after
Ianthe
 
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 477.729 Gm (3.193 AU)
Perihelion 325.503 Gm (2.176 AU)
401.616 Gm (2.685 AU)
Eccentricity 0.190
1606.670 d (4.40 a)
18.01 km/s
198.904°
Inclination 15.613°
354.137°
158.566°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 106.16 ± 3.76[1] km
Mass (8.93 ± 1.99) × 1017[1] kg
Mean density
1.42 ± 0.35[1] g/cm3
0.0292 m/s²
0.0552 km/s
16.479[2] h
Albedo 0.047 [3]
Temperature ~170 K
Spectral type
C
8.84

98 Ianthe (/ˈænθ/ eye-AN-thee) is a large main-belt asteroid, named for three figures in Greek mythology. It is very dark and is composed of carbonates. It was one of the numerous (for his time—the 19th century) discoveries by C. H. F. Peters, who found it on April 18, 1868, from Clinton, New York.

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 2007 at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico were used to create a light curve plot. This showed a synodic rotation period of 16.479 ± 0.001 hours and a brightness variation of 0.27 ± 0.02 magnitude during each cycle.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73: 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  2. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (June 2008), "Period Determination for 84 Klio, 98 Ianthe, 102 Miriam 112 Iphigenia, 131 Vala, and 650 Amalasuntha", Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers 35 (2): 71–72, Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...71P, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. 
  3. ^ Asteroid Data Sets