99 Dike

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99 Dike
Discovery[1] and designation
Discovered by Alphonse Borrelly
Discovery date May 28, 1868
Designations
Named after
Dike
A915 BA; 1935 UC; 1935 YL; 1939 UT; 1948 UE; 1948 WC; 1961 XJ; 1974 VB
Minor planet category Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 476.928 Gm (3.188 AU)
Perihelion 320.005 Gm (2.139 AU)
398.467 Gm (2.664 AU)
Eccentricity 0.197
1587.810 d (4.35 a)
18.07 km/s
304.205°
Inclination 13.858°
41.678°
196.045°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 71.9 km
Mass ~3.9×1017 kg
Mean density
2.0? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
~0.0201 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
~0.0380 km/s
18.127[1][2] h
0.058 [3]
Temperature ~172 K
C (Tholen)
Xk (Bus)[4]
9.43

99 Dike (/ˈdk/ DY-kee) is a quite large and dark main-belt asteroid. Dike was discovered by Alphonse Borrelly on May 28, 1868. It was his first asteroid discovery. It is named after Dike, the Greek goddess of moral justice.

Based upon a light curve that was generated from photometric observations of this asteroid at Pulkovo Observatory, it has a rotation period of 18.127 ± 0.002 hours and varies in brightness by 0.22 ± 0.02 in magnitude.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (October 2011), "Rotation Period Determinations for 11 Parthenope, 38 Leda, 111 Ate 194 Prokne, 217 Eudora, and 224 Oceana", Bulletin of the Minor Planets Section of the Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers 38 (4): 183–185, Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..183P. 
  2. ^ *JPL Small-Body Database Browser
  3. ^ Asteroid Data Sets
  4. ^ DeMeo, Francesca E. et al. (2011), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared", Icarus 202 (1): 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, retrieved 2013-03-33.  See appendix A.