99 Francs

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99 Francs
Author Frédéric Beigbeder
Country France
Language French
Genre Fiction
Publisher Grasset & Fasquelle
Publication date
August 2000
Media type Print
Pages 282 pgs
ISBN ISBN 2-246-56761-0

99 Francs is a 2000 novel by French writer Frédéric Beigbeder.[1] The book was released in France on August 2000 through Grasset & Fasquelle and has since been re-released under the titles € 14.99 and € 6.[2] Shortly after the book's initial release Beigbeder was fired from his advertising job after his employers read 99 Francs.[3]

In 2007 the book was adapted into a film by the same name that was directed by Jan Kounen.

Summary[edit]

The book follows Octave, a successful copywriter that appears to have it all. Not only is his job going well, but he has surrounded himself with expensive material goods, beautiful women, and lots of cocaine. That easygoing life ends when he becomes disillusioned with his life and his job after a meeting with a client ends with him smearing the word "pigs" on the walls using his own blood.

Reception[edit]

Jonathan Evans questioned the book's 2002 English translation, which changed the book's setting from France to England as well as changing francs to pounds.[4] Guardian reviewer Nicholas Lezard also commented on the changes to the book, stating that the "geographical and cultural translations are by no means consistent or necessarily successful".[2]

Adaptations[edit]

Theater[edit]

A stage production of 99 Francs was performed in the Treviso Theater that was directed by Stéphane Aucante.[5]

Film[edit]

Main article: 99 Francs (film)

In 2004 it was announced that a film adaptation of 99 Francs was in development.[6] The film was released on September 26, 2007 and was praised by Agora Vox as being "uncompromising".[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reyns-Chikuma, Chris (October 2008). "La fiction d'affaires : Une autre exception franCaise? 99 Francs de Frederic Beigbeder.". Contemporary French & Francophone Studies. Vol. 12 (Issue 4): p455–462. 
  2. ^ a b "99 francs (14.99€)". Krinein Magazine. Retrieved 24 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Lezard, Nicholas (12 July 2003). "Ad execs quoting Gramsci? Only in France". London: Guardian. Retrieved 24 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Parker, Rebecca (2008). Thinking Translation. Brown Walker Press. pp. 87–94. ISBN 1599424614. 
  5. ^ "Projet/ « 99 francs » va devenir une pièce". Le Parisen. Retrieved 24 November 2012. 
  6. ^ "Le best-seller de Beigbeder attendra des jours meilleurs". Le Parisen. Retrieved 24 November 2012. 
  7. ^ "99 francs : une œuvre sans concession". Agora Vox. Retrieved 24 November 2012.