9th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment

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9th New York Heavy Artillery
9th New York Heavy Artillery Battle Flag.jpg
9th New York Heavy Artillery Battle Flag
Active September 6, 1862 to July 6, 1865
Country United States
Allegiance Union
Branch Artillery
Type Heavy Artillery
Part of XXII Corps
and VI Corps
Nickname Second Auburn Regiment and Second Wayne and Cayuga Regiment
Colors Red and Gold
Engagements

Overland Campaign
Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864
Siege of Petersburg

Appomattox Campaign
Commanders
Regimental Commander (November 28, 1864 to July 6, 1865) Colonel James W. Snyder
Regimental Commander (May 21, 1864 to September 15, 1864) Colonel Edward P. Taft
Regimental Commander
(May 21, 1864 to September 15, 1864)
Colonel William H. Seward Jr.
Regimental Commander (August 22, 1862 to May 20, 1864) Colonel Joseph Welling

The 9th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment was a regiment in the American Civil War.

History[edit]

The regiment was originally mustered in on September 8, 1862 as the 138th New York Infantry Regiment, was quickly taken to Washington D.C. to be used in the defenses of the nation's capitol. On December 19, 1862, it was redesignated as the 9th New York Heavy Artillery Regiment. On February 5, 1863, an additional Company M was created within the regiment with the transfer of the 22d N.Y. Volunteer Battery. Company L was organized in Albany between November 4 and December 9, 1863.[1]

Amongst the regimental commanders, William H. Seward, Jr. stands out as he is the son of then Secretary of State William H. Seward.

The Regiment was divided into three battalions. After the formation of the regiment, its duties were the protection of the capitol. After General Ulysses S. Grant took command of the Union Army, most of the troops defending the capitol, including the 9th New York Heavy Artillery, were called to bolster troop numbers. Beginning with in Cold Harbor, two of the battalions joined with the VI Corps and the Army of the Potomac, while one remained behind to guard the capitol.

Timeline[edit]

Defense of Washington D.C. (September 1862-May 1864)

May 18, 1864: Joined the Army of the Potomac

Overland Campaign (May through June 1864)

  • May 26–28: On line of the Pamunky River

Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864 (August 7 - November 28)

  • October through December: Duty at Kernstown

Siege of Petersburg (December 1864-April 1865)[10]

Appomattox Campaign (March 28-April 9)

  • April 17–27: Expedition to Danville
  • April through June: Duty at Danville and Richmond

Regiment losses[edit]

Regiment losses included 10 Officers and 204 Enlisted men killed or mortally wounded. 247 Enlisted men died by disease. The total deaths were 461 Total, not including wounded casualties.

Post War[edit]

After the war, the soldiers of the Regiment not eligible for discharge from service were transferred to the 2nd New York Volunteer Artillery Regiment. They formed four companies, I, K, L and M.[12]

Further reading[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Roe, Alfred Seelye "In a Rebel prison; or, experiences in Danville." Personal Narratives Rhode Island soldiers and sailors historical society 4th ser, no. 16, 1891.
  • Roe, Alfred Seelye "Monocacy, a sketch of the battle of Monocacy, Md., July 9th, 1864", read before the Regimental reunion Oct. 19, 1894, in Weedsport, N. Y. Worcester: [F. S. Blanchard & co.] 1894.
  • Roe, Alfred Seelye "The Ninth New York heavy artillery, a history of its organization, services in the defenses of Washington, marches, camps, battles, and muster-out, with accounts of life in a Rebel prison, personal experiences, names and addresses of surviving members, personal sketches, and a complete roster of the Regiment" Worcester, Mass.: Published by the author, 1899.
  • Roe, Alfred Seelye "Richmond, Annapolis, and home." Personal Narratives Rhode Island soldiers and sailors historical society 4th ser, no 17, 1892.
  • Roe, Alfred Seelye "The youth in the rebellion, address given before Geo. H. Ward post 10, G.A.R. in Mechanics hall, Worcester, Mass., June 3, 1883, by Alfred S. Roe" Worcester: Press of Charles Hamilton, 1883.
  • "Recollections of Monocacy." Personal Narratives Rhode Island soldiers and sailors historical society 3d ser, no 10, 1885.
  • Saunders, Lisa. Ever True: Civil War Letters of Seward's New York 9th Heavy Artillery of Wayne and Cayuga Counties Between a Soldier, His Wife and His Canadian Family. Heritage Books, 2004. More information is here www.authorlisasaunders.com/ (link opens new window)
  • Snyder, Charles M. "A teen-age G.I. in the Civil war." New York History xxxv (1954) 14-31.

Websites[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alfred Seelye Roe (1899). The Ninth New York heavy artillery: A history of its organization, services in the defenses of Washington, marches, camps, battles, and muster-out ... and a complete roster of the regiment. The author. Retrieved 28 April 2012. 
  2. ^ "Civil War Defenses of Washington". www.nps.gov. National Park Service. June 23, 2014. Retrieved June 25, 2014. 
  3. ^ "National Park Service: Fort Foote". www.nps.gov. National Park Service. June 20, 2014. Retrieved June 26, 2014. 
  4. ^ "National Park Service: Fort Foote - History & Culture". www.nps.gov. National Park Service. June 20, 2014. Retrieved June 26, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Richmond National Battlefield Park: The Battle of Totopotomoy Creek, May 29-31, 1864". www.nps.gov. United States National Park Service. June 4, 2014. Retrieved June 26, 2014. 
  6. ^ National Park Service Cold Harbor web page within the Richmond National Battlefield website
  7. ^ National Park Service Petersburg National Battlefield website
  8. ^ National Park Service Monocacy National Battlefield Park website
  9. ^ Battle of Cedar Creek web site
  10. ^ Pamlin park web site
  11. ^ Petersburg web site
  12. ^ Unit History: 9th Heavy Artillery Regiment New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History. November 9, 2006 .

External links[edit]