A-List (Conservative)

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For other uses, see A-list (disambiguation).

The Conservative A-List or Priority List is a list of United Kingdom candidates drawn up by Conservative Central Office at the behest of David Cameron after his election as party leader in December 2005, aimed as a means of broadening the number of Conservative Members of Parliament, potential Peers of the Realm and MEPs from minority groups and women as well as other preferred candidates for candidature, where the preferred forums for selection are held at least two members from the list is put to every open primary. Where these are not held the A-list are recommended directly, particularly to the top target seats.

History[edit]

In April 2006, a Conservative Party committee on candidates set out to deliver a promise by David Cameron to transform the Conservative party at Westminster. The committee reduced 500 aspiring politicians on the party's list of approved parliamentary candidates to an "A-list" of between 100 and 150 priority candidates.[1] The result was a list on which more than half of the names were of women. The list included the former Coronation Street actor Adam Rickitt, the environmentalist Zac Goldsmith, the author Louise Bagshawe (later Mensch), and Margot James.[2]

Amid controversy the "A-list" approach was endorsed by Michael Portillo, the party's MP until 2005, who in 2006 said that

Conservative chairmen and activists in seats considered potentially winnable were in the run-up to the 2010 election urged by Conservative Central Office to select candidates from the new A-list and were in many cases included in open primaries, new and preferred open-to-all selection meetings.[4]

The 2010 general election saw failures as well as successes for the "A-listers" selected for 'winnable' seats. Success was epitomised by, for example, Zac Goldsmith in Richmond Park, but failure by Joanne Cash, Philippa Stroud and Shaun Bailey.[5]

Listed[edit]

Those on the 'A' List include the following: '*' marks people chosen for seats that were Conservative before 2010 [6][7][8]

Notes and References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ PPC Croydon North 2005
  2. ^ PPC Stockton North 2005
  3. ^ PPC Lancaster & Wyre 2005
  4. ^ PPC Tooting 2005
  5. ^ PPC Hove 2005
  6. ^ PPC Manchester Withington 2005
  7. ^ London Assembly Member
  8. ^ PPC Warrington South 2005
  9. ^ PPC Eastleigh, 2005
  10. ^ Former Camden LB opposition lead councillor. PPC Bristol West 2001
  11. ^ PPC Northampton North 2005
  12. ^ Westmoreland and Lonsdale MP 1997–2005
  13. ^ PPC Portsmouth South 2005
  14. ^ PPC Pendle 2005
  15. ^ PPC Stevenage 2005
  16. ^ PPC Brighton Pavilion 2001
  17. ^ PPC Dudley North 2001; European candidate in 2004
  18. ^ Special Adviser to Tim Yeo
  19. ^ MEP for the East Midlands, 1999–2009
  20. ^ PPC Holborn & Pancras 2005
  21. ^ PPC Broxtowe 2001
  22. ^ 2005 Knowsley South PPC
  23. ^ PPC Blaenau Gwent 2005
  24. ^ Leader of Brentwood Borough Council
  25. ^ PPC Sedgefield 2005
  26. ^ Bristol councillor
  27. ^ former deputy Leader of Westminster Council
  28. ^ PPC Twickenham 2005
  29. ^ PPC Wirral West 2005
  30. ^ PPC Selby 2005
  31. ^ PPC Nottingham North 2005
  32. ^ PPC Nuneaton 2005
  33. ^ PPC Normanton 2005
  34. ^ PPC Makerfield 2005
  35. ^ PPC Somerton & Frome 2010
  36. ^ PPC Liverpool Garston 2005
  37. ^ PPC Gedling 2005
  38. ^ Macclesfield councillor
  39. ^ PPC Birmingham Ladywood 2005
  40. ^ PPC Calder Valley 2005
  41. ^ PPC Dewsbury 2005
  42. ^ PPC Coventry South, 2001 & 2005
  43. ^ Leader of Trafford Council 2004-2009
References
  1. ^ Will Woodward and Tania Branigan, The A-list: new leader's drive for women and minority candidates in The Guardian, 19 April 2006
  2. ^ Will Woodward, chief political correspondent, Former soap star on Cameron's A-list of Tory candidates in The Guardian, 11 May 2006
  3. ^ Michael Portillo, Cameron’s A-list could give Tories the X factor in The Sunday Times dated July 30, 2006, online
  4. ^ A-list 'not snubbing' NE England dated 20 October 2006 at bbc.co.uk
  5. ^ Carol Driver, What happened to Cameron's A-listers? Zac Goldsmith wins... but 'Cutie' Cash fails dated 7th May 2010 at dailymail.co.uk
  6. ^ Rosemary Bennett, The A-list in The Times dated June 12, 2006, at timesonline.co.uk
  7. ^ Who is on the A-list? at conservativehome web site
  8. ^ Conservative A-List and selections dated 4th Jun 2006 at colin-ross.org.uk