A.T. Kearney

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
A.T. Kearney
Type Incorporated Partnership
Industry Management consulting
Founded 1926 by Mr. Andrew Thomas Kearney
Headquarters Franklin Center
Chicago, United States
Number of locations 58 offices in 40 countries
Key people Johan Aurik, Managing Officer and Chairman of the Board
Services Management consulting services
Revenue $1 billion (est. 2011)
Employees 3,200 (2,300 consultants)[1]
Website www.atkearney.com

A.T. Kearney is a global management consulting firm that focuses on strategic and operational CEO-agenda issues facing businesses, governments and institutions around the globe. The firm is regularly ranked in Consulting Magazine’s annual list of the "Best Firms to Work For",[2] and Vault’s annual list of "Top 10 Best Consulting Firms".[3] As of March 2014, 58 A.T. Kearney offices exist in 40 countries.

Practice areas[edit]

A.T. Kearney's industry specialties include aerospace and defense, automotive, chemicals, communications media and technology, consumer products and retail, financial institutions, healthcare, metals and mining, oil and gas, private equity, public sector, transportation travel, and infrastructure and utilities.[4] Major service lines are in strategy, analytics, mergers and acquisitions, innovation, operations, technology strategy, organization and transformation, marketing and sales, procurement, and sustainability.[5]

Offices[edit]

A.T. Kearney operates 58 offices in 40 countries. The firm opened its first international office in Düsseldorf in 1964. Its first office in Asia was opened in 1972, in Tokyo.

Americas[edit]

Asia Pacific[edit]

Europe[edit]

Middle East and Africa[edit]

History[edit]

The origins of A.T. Kearney goes back to the founding of McKinsey in 1926 in Chicago by James McKinsey under the name James O. McKinsey & Company.[6]

James McKinsey hired Andrew Thomas Kearney in 1929 as the firm's first partner, before roping in Marvin Bower.[7] In 1935, Marshall Field's became a client, and convinced James McKinsey to leave the firm to accept a temporary position and become its CEO to help the company through a restructuring.[8][9][10] After McKinsey left, the remaining members of the firm agreed to merge with accounting firm Scovell, Wellington & Company, creating the firm McKinsey, Wellington & Company. In 1937, James McKinsey died unexpectedly of pneumonia. While the firm continued to operate as before, Andrew Thomas Kearney and the remaining partners disagreed over how to run the company, leading to the division of McKinsey, Wellington & Company in 1939. C. Oliver Wellington returned to manage Scovell, Wellington & Company and took the accounting practice with him. The management practice was split into two affiliated firms: Andrew Thomas Kearney continued to run the original Chicago office, renaming the firm McKinsey, Kearney & Company, while Marvin Bower, the head of the New York office, continued the practice in New York and retained the rights to the name McKinsey & Company in all areas other than the Midwest. In 1947, Bower purchased the exclusive rights to the name McKinsey & Company from Tom Kearney, who renamed his firm A.T. Kearney & Company.

1926–1987[edit]

  • 1926 – McKinsey is established
  • 1929 – Andrew Thomas Kearney joins McKinsey as its first partner
  • 1935 – Tom Kearney becomes managing partner
  • 1939 – The firm splits in two: McKinsey & Co. moves to New York and Boston, and McKinsey, Kearney & Co. remains in Chicago
  • 1945 – Tom Kearney asked by President Franklin Roosevelt to head mission to help the Chinese improve their defense readiness efforts. Kearney received a U.S. Medal of Freedom and a Victory Medal from the Chinese government
  • 1946 – Firm adopts the name A.T. Kearney & Company
  • 1962 – Tom Kearney dies January 11
  • 1963 – A.T. Kearney & Company, Inc., incorporated in April; A.T. Kearney International, Inc., incorporated in July as a subsidiary
  • 1964 – A.T. Kearney, G.m.b.H., established as first non‑U.S. office in Düsseldorf, led by Art Kelly
  • 1968 – Expansion continues with offices opened in San Francisco, New York, Milan, Paris, and London
  • 1972 – Firm’s name changed to A.T. Kearney, Inc.; First Asian office opens in Tokyo
  • 1980 – Offices open in Amsterdam, Stuttgart, Atlanta, Boston, and Dallas
  • 1986 – Joint ventures in China, Taiwan, and Tunisia signed

1987–1994[edit]

  • 1988 – Biggest expansion in the history of the firm peaks with 20 of 26 offices enlarged, relocated or opened since late 1985; offices open in Madrid and Munich
  • 1988 - Named fifth-largest broad-based multidisciplined management consultancy in the United States; Firm surpasses $100 million in revenue
  • 1989 – A.T. Kearney’s operation in West Germany celebrates 25th anniversary
  • 1989 - A.T. Kearney staff worldwide reaches 1,000 employees
  • 1990 – Office opens in Singapore
  • 1991 – Office opens in Berlin
  • 1992 – Three Nordic offices acquired in Copenhagen, Oslo and Stockholm; offices open in Hong Kong and Prague
  • 1992 - Global Business Policy Council formed to provide a global strategic forum for corporate executives and policy leaders
  • 1993 – Firm marks 10th straight year of double-digit growth
  • 1994 – Wins two five-year contracts from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, largest in firm’s history
  • 1994 - Offices open in Helsinki, Mexico City, São Paulo, Sydney, Melbourne, and Silicon Valley

1995–2005[edit]

In 1995, A.T. Kearney was acquired by EDS, a large technology consulting firm.[11]

  • 1995 – A.T. Kearney hires 2,000th employee
  • 1995 - A.T. Kearney becomes a wholly owned subsidiary of EDS in September, nearly doubling in size and vastly expanding its industry expertise and information technology capabilities
  • 1995 - Offices open in Beijing, Warsaw, and Seoul
  • 1996 – Moscow office expansion makes A.T. Kearney the multinational consultancy with the largest on‑site capability in Russia
  • 1996 - Offices open in Kuala Lumpur, Lisbon, and Rome
  • 1997 – First Global Prize, an annual business school case study competition for potential recruits, awarded
  • 1997 - Offices open in New Delhi, Shanghai, and Jakarta; revenues top $1 billion
  • 1998 – Premiere issue of Executive Agenda, the firm’s thought-leadership journal, published; offices open in Vienna and Frankfurt
  • 2002 – Consulting Magazine names Ben T. Smith IV to its list of Top 25 Most Influential Consultants
  • 2005 – A.T. Kearney officers elect a new board of directors
  • 2005 - Paul A. Laudicina, director of A.T. Kearney’s Global Business Policy Council, named to Consulting Magazine's list of Top 25 Most Influential Consultants

2006 to the present[edit]

In 2005, EDS CEO, Michael Jordan, confirmed rumors that EDS was seeking to sell A.T. Kearney back to its management team. The transaction was completed in January 2006.[12] More than 170 A.T. Kearney officers from 26 countries participated in the transaction as investors (90% of those invited to participate did so).

  • 2006 – A.T. Kearney completes management buyout from EDS and becomes an independent, privately owned firm
  • 2006 - A.T. Kearney celebrates 80th anniversary
  • 2006 – Officers elect Paul Laudicina as managing officer and chairman of the board
  • 2006 – Offices open in Dubai and Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • 2007 – Office opens in Bucharest, Romania
  • 2011 - Office opens in Istanbul
  • 2012 - A.T. Kearney partners elect Johan Aurik to a three-year term as Managing Partner and Chairman of the Board[13]
  • 2013 - The firm launches Vision 2020[14] and sets an ambitious agenda for growth

Global Business Policy Council[edit]

A.T. Kearney’s Global Business Policy Council (GBPC) helps business and government leaders worldwide anticipate and plan for the future. In 1992, Paul A. Laudicina, A.T. Kearney’s current managing partner and chairman of the board, launched the Council and served as its first director. The Council is currently led by Erik R. Peterson, who joined A.T. Kearney in 2010 from the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where he served as senior vice president. The core GBPC team is based in Washington, D.C. and draws on the expertise of a wide range of international experts.

The GBPC offers business and government leaders three key services:

  • The annual GBPC CEO Retreat convenes 55 leading executives and policy figures to discuss key global issues, best practices, and strategy.[15]
  • Intellectual capital that helps leaders calibrate and plan for the future through:
    • Global Services Location Index: The analysis and ranking of the top 50 countries worldwide as the best destinations for outsourcing activities, including IT services and support, contact centers and back-office support[16]
    • Foreign Direct Investment Confidence Index: The assessment of present and future prospects for international investment flows via a survey of global executives, whose companies account for over $2 trillion in annual global revenue[17]
  • Customized strategic advisory services, including scenario planning, location assessment, investment promotion, and global foresight

Competitors[edit]

A.T. Kearney's top competitors include McKinsey & Company, Bain & Company, the Boston Consulting Group, PwC, Oliver Wyman, Deloitte Consulting, and Roland Berger Strategy Consultants.

Awards and recognitions[edit]

A.T. Kearney has consistently ranked among the top management consulting firms globally. The firm has been listed in Consulting Magazine's "Best Firms to Work For" list 6 years in a row.[18] The firm is a perennial on the Vault Guide's ranking of the most prestigious firms to work for.[19] Working Mother magazine also ranks A.T. Kearney in its "Best Companies" list.[20]

Recruiting[edit]

A.T. Kearney's recruiting process is notoriously demanding, with candidates going through multiple rounds of individual case, written case and experience-based interviews. In 2012, the career review site Glassdoor ranked A.T. Kearney as the 4th most difficult company to interview with.[21]

Undergraduates or non-MBA graduates enter the firm as Business Analysts or Senior Business Analysts, where they develop models, perform complex analyses, and work on research assignments at both the office and client sites. MBAs join the firm as Associates, and are involved in all phases of a consulting engagement, from pre-proposal research through final implementation. Managers at the firm have project oversight on engagements, and are responsible for assigning specific tasks to the staff and ensuring deliverables are scheduled and presented on time. Principals are expected to manage large, complex engagements, build client relationships and contribute to business development while Partners are involved in senior client relationship development and management, collaborating with CEOs to create long-term strategies and develop enduring relationships. Partners also take an active role in the leadership of A.T. Kearney, developing future leaders and executing the business strategy for the firm. Principals and Partners are elected to their position.

Notable current and former employees[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.atkearney.com/about-us/who-we-are
  2. ^ Best Firms to Work For (2013)
  3. ^ Top 10 Best Consulting Firms (2014)
  4. ^ http://www.atkearney.com/industries
  5. ^ http://www.atkearney.com/services
  6. ^ "McKinsey & Company on Forbes' America's Largest Private Companies list". Forbes. November 3, 2010. Retrieved January 1, 2011. 
  7. ^ L. Urwick, O.B.E., M.C., Ma., F.I.I.A. "History of Consulting. Retrieved". The Elements of Administration. Retrieved May 23, 2012. 
  8. ^ Huey, John (November 1, 1993). "How McKinsey Does It". Fortune. Retrieved May 20, 2012. 
  9. ^ Bhide, Amar (March 1996). "Building the Professional Firm: McKinsey & Co.: 1939-1968". Retrieved April 10, 2012. 
  10. ^ Kim, James (May 19, 1993). "McKinsey: CEO factory". USA Today (Money section). pp. Page 1B. 
  11. ^ Dobrzynski, Judith H. (May 31, 1995). "E.D.S. Resumes Purchase Talks With Kearney". The New York Times. 
  12. ^ A.T. Kearney completes management buy-out from EDS
  13. ^ http://www.consultingmag.com/article/ART1061067?C=LccVK4lKF0QqUMEI
  14. ^ Vision 2020
  15. ^ Ruiz, Rebecca (May 5, 2008). "How CEOs Stay On Top Of Their Game". Forbes. Retrieved February 12, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Global Services Location Index". Global Business Policy Council. A.T. Kearney. Retrieved 5 September 2012. 
  17. ^ "Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Confidence Index®". Global Business Policy Council. A.T. Kearney. Retrieved 5 September 2012. 
  18. ^ http://www.atkearney.com/documents/3249035/3249213/A.T.+Kearney_Best+Firm.pdf/1a58babb-aaed-438d-9bb3-21a4b5efecca
  19. ^ http://www.vault.com/blog/job-search/vaults-2014-consulting-rankings-are-here/
  20. ^ http://www.workingmother.com/best-companies/kearney
  21. ^ http://www.businessinsider.com/companies-with-the-most-difficult-interviews-2012-7?op=1
  22. ^ Apple Hires Bob Kupbens From Delta for Its E-Commerce Arm, AdAge

External links[edit]