ABCG1

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ATP-binding cassette, sub-family G (WHITE), member 1
Identifiers
Symbols ABCG1 ; ABC8; WHITE1
External IDs OMIM603076 MGI107704 HomoloGene21022 GeneCards: ABCG1 Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE ABCG1 204567 s at tn.png
PBB GE ABCG1 211113 s at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 9619 11307
Ensembl ENSG00000160179 ENSMUSG00000024030
UniProt P45844 Q64343
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_004915 NM_009593
RefSeq (protein) NP_004906 NP_033723
Location (UCSC) Chr 21:
43.62 – 43.72 Mb
Chr 17:
31.06 – 31.12 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ABCG1 gene.[1][2][3] It is a homolog of the well-known Drosophila gene white.

The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. ABC proteins transport various molecules across extra- and intra-cellular membranes. ABC genes are divided into seven distinct subfamilies (ABC1, MDR/TAP, MRP, ALD, OABP, GCN20, White). This protein is a member of the White subfamily. It is involved in macrophage, cholesterol and phospholipids transport, and may regulate cellular lipid homeostasis in other cell types. Several alternative splice variants have been identified.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chen H, Rossier C, Lalioti MD, Lynn A, Chakravarti A, Perrin G, Antonarakis SE (Aug 1996). "Cloning of the cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila white gene and mapping to chromosome 21q22.3". Am J Hum Genet 59 (1): 66–75. PMC 1915121. PMID 8659545. 
  2. ^ Engel T, Bode G, Lueken A, Knop M, Kannenberg F, Nofer JR, Assmann G, Seedorf U (Aug 2006). "Expression and functional characterization of ABCG1 splice variant ABCG1(666)". FEBS Lett 580 (18): 4551–9. doi:10.1016/j.febslet.2006.07.006. PMID 16870176. 
  3. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: ABCG1 ATP-binding cassette, sub-family G (WHITE), member 1". 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.