ADS 16402

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ADS 16402
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Lacerta[1]
ADS 16402 A
Right ascension 22h 57m 45.919s[2]
Declination +38° 40′ 27.19″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) +10.0[3]
ADS 16402 B (HAT-P-1)
Right ascension 22h 57m 46.844s[2]
Declination +38° 40′ 30.33″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) +10.4[3]
Characteristics
ADS 16402 A
Spectral type F8[3]/G0V[4]
ADS 16402 B (HAT-P-1)
Spectral type F8[3]/G0V[4]
Astrometry
ADS 16402 A
Radial velocity (Rv) -3.43 ± 0.32[4] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 29.9 ± 0.6[2] mas/yr
Dec.: -42.5 ± 1.2[2] mas/yr
Distance 450+72
−62
ly
(139 +22
−19
[4] pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 3.4 ± 0.3[4]
ADS 16402 B (HAT-P-1)
Radial velocity (Rv) -2.94 ± 0.56[4] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 32.7 ± 0.8[2] mas/yr
Dec.: -43.2 ± 1.9[2] mas/yr
Distance 450+72
−62
ly
(139 +22
−19
[4] pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 3.7 ± 0.3[4]
Details
ADS 16402 A
Mass 1.16 ± 0.11[4] M
Radius 1.123 +0.14
−0.10
[4] R
Luminosity 1.82 +0.75
−0.53
[4] L
Surface gravity (log g) 4.13 ± 0.10[4] cgs
Temperature 6047 ± 56[4] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] +0.12 ± 0.05[4] dex
Rotational velocity (v sin i) 7.1 ± 0.3[4] km/s
Age 3.6 [4] Gyr
ADS 16402 B (HAT-P-1)
Mass 1.151 +0.052
−0.051
[5] M
Radius 1.174 +0.026
−0.027
[5] R
Luminosity 1.585 +0.099
−0.094
[5] L
Surface gravity (log g) 4.359 ± 0.014[5] cgs
Temperature 5980 ± 49[5] K
Metallicity [Fe/H] 0.130 ± 0.08[5] dex
Rotational velocity (v sin i) 2.2 ± 0.2[4] km/s
Age 3.6 [4] Gyr
Other designations
HJ 1832, CCDM J22578+3840, WDS J22578+3840
ADS 16402 A: BD+37 4734p, PPM 88381
ADS 16402 B: HAT-P-1, BD+37 4734s, PPM 88382
Database references
SIMBAD data
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

ADS 16402 is a binary star system, composed of two sun-like stars located 450 light-years away in the constellation Lacerta. It was first identified by John Herschel in 1831.[4] The two stars are separated by 1500 AUs. The star system is estimated to be 3.6 billion years old.[3] The secondary star ADS 16402 B is also designated HAT-P-1.

Planetary system[edit]

In 2006 the HATNet Project announced the discovery of a hot jupiter type gas giant extrasolar planet in orbit around the secondary star. Following the designation scheme used by the HATNet Project, the secondary star is known as HAT-P-1, and the planet itself designated HAT-P-1b.[4]

The HAT-P-1 planetary system
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b 0.524 ± 0.031 MJ 0.0553 ± 0.0014 4.4652934 ± 0.000093 <0.067

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roman, Nancy G. (1987). "Identification of a Constellation From a Position". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific 99 (617): 695–699. Bibcode:1987PASP...99..695R. doi:10.1086/132034.  Vizier query form
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Zacharias, N. et al. (2013). "The Fourth US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC4)". The Astronomical Journal 145 (2). 44. arXiv:1212.6182. Bibcode:2013AJ....145...44Z. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/145/2/44. Vizier catalog entry for ADS 16402A Vizier catalog entry for ADS 16402B
  3. ^ a b c d e "SIMBAD query result: ADS16402". Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2009-05-10. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Bakos, G. Á. et al. (2007). "HAT-P-1b: A Large-Radius, Low-Density Exoplanet Transiting One Member of a Stellar Binary". The Astrophysical Journal 656 (1): 552–559. arXiv:astro-ph/0609369. Bibcode:2007ApJ...656..552B. doi:10.1086/509874. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Nikolov, N. et al. (2013). "Hubble Space Telescope hot Jupiter transmission spectral survey: a detection of Na and strong optical absorption in HAT-P-1b". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. arXiv:1310.0083. Bibcode:2013arXiv1310.0083N. doi:10.1093/mnras/stt1859. 

External links[edit]

  • "HAT-P-1". Exoplanets. Retrieved 2009-05-10. 

Coordinates: Sky map 22h 57m 47s, +38° 40′ 30″