A Film with Me in It

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A Film With Me in It
A film with me in it.png
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Ian Fitzgibbon
Produced by Alan Moloney
Susan Mullen
Written by Mark Doherty
Starring Dylan Moran
Mark Doherty
Amy Huberman
Keith Allen
Music by Denis Woods
Cinematography Seamus Deasy
Edited by Tony Cranstoun
Production
company
Parallel Films
Distributed by Element Pictures (Ireland)
IFC Films (United States)
Release dates 12 July 2008 (Galway Film Fleadh)
17 October 2008 (Ireland)
Running time 83 minutes[1]
Country Ireland
Language English

A Film With Me in It is a 2008 Irish film directed by Ian Fitzgibbon and written by Mark Doherty. The film is a black comedy that follows Mark (also Mark Doherty) and Pierce (Dylan Moran), an unsuccessful actor and a failing writer respectively, who find themselves trying to cope after a string of accidents surrounds them in corpses. The film generally received a positive response, and was released on DVD in October 2011.

Plot[edit]

Mark (Doherty) is an actor living in a basement flat below his writer friend Pierce (Moran). Residing with his girlfriend, Sally (Huberman), Mark struggles to find work whilst caring for his paralysed brother, David (O'Doherty). Desperate to avoid paying overdue rent, Mark continually eludes landlord Jack (Allen), meaning he is also unable to inform Jack of the flat's dilapidated state.

Discovering that Mark wasted money meant for the overdue rent, Sally finally decides to end her strained relationship with Mark, informs Jack of the repairs needed, and arranges to move out. The damaged state of the flat reaching its peak, Mark witnesses two consecutive freak accidents; a bookshelf falls and kills his dog, and the living room chandelier collapses and crushes David. Reeling in horror from the events, Mark looks on as Jack appears to repair a high lightbulb atop a wobbly stool, only to fall and pierce his throat with his screwdriver. Pierce then arrives and discovers the corpses, causing him to panic.

Hiding in the bathroom, Mark and Pierce plot to control the situation, only for Sally to return. Discovering David's body, Sally faints and impales herself on Mark's clarinet stand, killing her too. Realizing the absurdity of four consecutive, fatal accidents occurring in one place, Pierce concocts a plan to move Jack's body to an alternative location, as they both had a strong motive to murder him. Shooing Sally's father when he arrives, a police officer (O'Sullivan) then arrives due to an unrelated noise complaint, causing Pierce to panic and take her hostage.

Unable to kill the officer, the duo ties her up and attempts to reason with her. Left unattended, she attempts to escape through a faulty window, only for it to close and crush her head. Now surrounded by several corpses, Pierce finally formulates a plan; placing David, Sally, Jack, and the dog in his car, they drive it to a secluded area and cause it to explode, leaving minimal forensic evidence. Additionally, since three immediate deaths of Mark's acquaintances can place suspicion on him, Mark places his jewellery and clarinet on David's corpse, faking his own death.

Finally moving the officer to the neighbour's garden, Pierce fakes her death as caused by a falling plant pot. Cutting Mark's hair and dressing him as David, the two attempt to pass Mark as his disabled brother, and give Pierce an alibi as his carer in Mark's absence. A closing epilogue then shows Pierce has written a script based on the film's events, and is currently directing it whilst Mark continues to pass as David.

Cast[edit]

Cameos by Irish director Neil Jordan, and actor Jonathan Rhys Meyers.

Production[edit]

The film was shot in the Dublin 4 area.

Reception[edit]

Michael Dwyer of the Irish Times gave the film 4 stars out of 5 and described it as "Withnail & I reworked by Joe Orton". [4]

It was nominated for six Irish Film and Television Awards including Best Film, Best Actor (Dylan Moran) and Best Screenplay (Mark Doherty), but did not win, with the film Hunger winning in six of eight categories in which it was nominated.[5][6]

It won the Special Jury Prize at the 28th International Istanbul Film Festival in Turkey.[7]

References[edit]

External links[edit]