A Hope for Home

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A Hope for Home
Origin United States Portland, Oregon, USA
Genres Post-hardcore, post-metal, post-rock[1]
Years active 2006-present
Labels Facedown Records[2]
Website www.ahopeforhome.tumblr.com
Members Nathan Winchell
Matthew Ellis
Tanner Morita
Dan McCall
Eric Gerard
Lance Taylor
Past members Kyle Cooke
Todd Farr
Ian Vidovic

A Hope for Home (commonly abbreviated to AHFH) is a post-metal band based in Portland, Oregon that formed in 2006.[3] They have 3 studio albums, two of which were released on Facedown Records and Strike First (the imprint label of Facedown Records). Throughout their career, A Hope for Home has controlled many of the aspects of their music including recording, production, mixing, art direction, and art design.[4] These commitments have allowed them to achieve the precise sound and imagery of their intentions, and have become part of the band's dynamic.[5]

History[edit]

Formation and Here, the End (2006–2007)[edit]

Founded in 2006 by friends Kyle Cooke and Matthew Ellis, "A Hope for Home" was a project devised by Cooke after discovering that he had cancer.

After a long struggle with cancer, founding member Kyle Cooke passed away on August 5, 2006. After his death, friends and family members of Cooke created the "Kyle Cooke Foundation", a "non-profit fundraising corporation that raises money for The Friends of Doernbecher Foundation and the people of the Camas and Washougal community on a need by need basis".[7]

Kyle Cooke playing at the Noisebox in 2006

On their website is a post stating the following:

A sample of the song "Kyle", from their debut album.

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A Hope for Home has since continued with new members, while still bearing the name created by Kyle Cooke as a remembrance of their formation. In 2007, A Hope for Home entered the home studio of bassist Dan McCall (Robots Ate My Studio) and recorded their first album Here, the End.[9] The track "Kyle" off of the album was written for Kyle Cooke by Matthew Ellis, and in the linear notes of the album there are words stating that the entire album is dedicated to the memory of Kyle Cooke. After releasing Here, the End in 2007, A Hope for Home gained local praise and began building their fan base by playing routinely at local venues such as The Noisebox in Camas, Wa and the Satyricon nightclub in Portland, OR.[10][11]

The Everlasting Man and Realis (2008-2010)[edit]

After several months of touring for Here, the End, A Hope for Home re-entered the studio to begin recording their next album.[12]

On December 4, 2008 the band announced via their Purevolume page that they had signed to Strike First Records (the imprint label for Facedown Records).[13] "After 2 years of being a 100% DIY group we have finally been given an awesome chance to take the next step in the industry, and we can't be more excited".[14]

A sample of the song "Absolution: Of Flight And Failure", from their sophomore album.

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The Everlasting Man was released on January 20, 2009 on Strike First Records.[15] The title of the album is taken from the G. K. Chesterton nonfiction work of the same name. The Everlasting Man added more atmospheric textures to their sound, using many different guitar effects and tones woven together with electronic backgrounds while still holding a strong drum and bass foundation. In an interview with Indie Vision Music, Keyboardist Eric Gerrard explained that "We wanted to sing about and affirm value in things that aren’t often talked about in the current scene today" and that "a lot of our ideas lined up with what Chesterton talks about in the book (The Everlasting Man)".[16]

A sample of the song "The Machine Stops", from their third album.

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In September, 2009 after several months of touring A Hope for Home announced that drummer Ian Vidovic would be leaving the band to pursue his other musical projects "Roads" and international touring with "The New Divide".[17]

Ian Vidovic with his band "Roads" in 2011

After the departure of Vidovic, A Hope for Home entered a practice space in Beaverton, Oregon (recruiting the help of fellow drummer Lance Taylor) and began writing Realis, their third album to date.[18] Throughout January 2010 A Hope for Home recorded at the "Red Room Studios" in Seattle, Washington and "Robots Ate My Studio" in Camas, WA.[19] The album was produced by bassist Dan McCall, mastered by Troy Glessner at "Spectre Mastering", and featured art direction and design by guitarist Tanner Morita. Realis, a concept album about the search for meaning in a seemingly meaningless world, was a drastic change in the band's musical style. Far from the "breakdowns", "dance parts", and "double bass" of their previous records, Realis brought song structures and instrumentation that clearly indicated their Post and Sludge metal influences (Envy, Cult Of Luna, Isis).[20] The album was well received by many music review sites (Absolute Punk, The New Review, Indie Vision Music).[21][22][23]

In Abstraction - Present[edit]

On September 10, 2011 the band announced via their Facebook page that they had finished their fourth official album titled "In Abstraction", and that it is set to be released on December 6, 2011 on Facedown Records.[24] On November 25, 2011 the band played a cd release show for In Abstraction at the local Portland, OR Rotture-Branx venue complex along with local artists Tribes, Tiny Dads, Amos Val, My Mantle, and Kye Kye.[25]

Genre and influences[edit]

Genre[edit]

Often described as Post-hardcore, A Hope for Home covers many other genres including Sludge metal, Post-rock, Post-metal, Alternative, and Experimental rock. With their debut album Here, The End, some of the band's more Metalcore and Melodic hardcore influences can be heard. After the release of The Everlasting Man, the band developed a far more atmospheric and electric sound.[26] The band's third album, Realis, defined a significant change in the bands direction towards their Sludge metal and Post-metal influences.[27][28][29] Perhaps one of the best examples of this is the guitar riff heard at 3:06 on the song "The Machine Stops", which gives a direct indication of Panopticon era Isis.[30][31][32]

Influences[edit]

A Hope for Home has a wide variety of influences, the following are some that have been mentioned by the band. Cult of Luna, Isis, Envy, Thrice, This Will Destroy You, Sigur Rós, Mono, Thursday, Underoath, Death Cab for Cutie.[33][34] On the subject of the band's influences, Keyboardist Eric Gerrard stated "bands like those that aren’t limited to one genre and continue to grow throughout their careers".[35]

Band members[edit]

Current
Former
  • Kyle Cooke - guitar
  • Todd Farr - guitar, vocals
  • Ian Vidovic - drums

Discography[edit]

Videography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A Hope for Home at All Music". Allmusic.com. Retrieved 13 September 2011. 
  2. ^ "A Hope for Home at Facedown Records". Facedownrecords.com. Retrieved 10 September 2011. 
  3. ^ A Hope for Home. Interview W/ A Hope for Home. (Interview). Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  4. ^ "A Hope for Home Artist Profile". Newreleasetuesday.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  5. ^ "Strike First Records signs A Hope For Home". Lambgoat.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  6. ^ Ellis, Matthew. Pondering the Post Hardcore Age. (Interview). 101distribution.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  7. ^ "The Kyle Cooke Foundation". Myspace.com. Retrieved 13 September 2011. 
  8. ^ "The Kyle Cooke Foundation". Myspace.com. Retrieved 13 September 2011. 
  9. ^ "A Hope for Home Artist Profile". Newreleasetuesday.com. Retrieved 14 September 2011. 
  10. ^ Ellis, Matthew. Pondering the Post Hardcore Age. (Interview). 101distribution.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  11. ^ A Hope for Home. Interview W/ A Hope for Home. (Interview). Hurdcore.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  12. ^ "A Hope for Home interview with Thrash Mag". Thrashmag.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  13. ^ "A Hope for Home signs to Strike First". Metalunderground.com. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  14. ^ "A Hope for Home announces signing to Strike First". Purevolume.com. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  15. ^ "The Everlasting Man album review at Indie Vision Music". Indievisionmusic.com. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  16. ^ Gerrard, Eric. Interview with A Hope for Home. (Interview). Indievisionmusic.com. Retrieved 14 September 2011. 
  17. ^ "Ian Vidovic project". Myspace.com. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  18. ^ "A Hope for Home interview with Hope Core". Hopecore.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  19. ^ "A Hope for Home records in Seattle, WA". Tumblr.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  20. ^ "A Hope for Home list of changes". Tumblr.com. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  21. ^ "Realis album review at The New Review". Thenewreview.net. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  22. ^ "Realis album review at Indie Vision Music". Indievisionmusic.com. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  23. ^ "Realis album review at Absolute Punk". Absolutepunk.net. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  24. ^ "A Hope for Home at Facebook". Facebook.com. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  25. ^ "In Abstraction CD Release Show". Facebook.com. Retrieved 28 November 2011. 
  26. ^ "The Everlasting Man review at Indie Vision Music". Indievisionmusic.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  27. ^ "Realis review at Metal Review". Metalreview.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  28. ^ "Realis review at The New Review". Thenewreview.net. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  29. ^ "Realis review at Indie Vision Music". Indievisionmusic.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  30. ^ "Realis review at Sputnikmusic". Sputnikmusic.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  31. ^ "Realis review at Metal Review". Metalreview.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  32. ^ "Realis review at Absolute Punk". Absolutepunk.net. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  33. ^ "A Hope for Home influences". Formspring.me. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  34. ^ "A Hope for Home early influences". Hurdcore.com. Retrieved 15 September 2011. 
  35. ^ Gerrard, Eric. Eric Gerrard on influences. (Interview). Indievisionmusic.com. Retrieved 30 September 2011. 

External links[edit]