A minor

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A minor
Relative key C major
Parallel key A major
Dominant key E minor
Subdominant D minor
Component pitches
A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A
A natural minor scale ascending and descending. About this sound Play 
A harmonic minor scale ascending and descending. About this sound Play 
A melodic minor scale ascending and descending. About this sound Play 
A melodic minor scale in just intonation ascending and descending. About this sound Play 

A minor (abbreviated Am) is a minor scale based on A, consisting of the pitches A, B, C, D, E, F, and G. The harmonic minor scale raises the G to G. Its key signature has no flats or sharps (see below: Scales and keys).

Its relative major is C major, and its parallel major is A major.

Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with accidentals as necessary.

Johann Joachim Quantz considered A minor, along with C minor, much more suitable for expressing "the sad effect" than other minor keys (Versuch einer Anweisung die Flöte traversiere zu spielen[full citation needed]).

Change from A major to A minor with naturals to cancel out the sharps.

Whereas traditionally key signatures were cancelled[clarification needed] whenever the new key signature had fewer sharps or flats than the old key signature, in modern popular and commercial music, cancellation is only done when C major or A minor replaces another key.[1]

Well-known compositions in this key[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Matthew Nicholl & Richard Grudzinski, Music Notation: Preparing Scores and Parts, ed. Jonathan Feist. Boston: Berklee Press (2007): 56. "In popular and commercial music, the old key signature is cancelled only if the new key is C major or A minor."