Aarwangen Castle

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Aarwangen Castle
Schloss Aarwangen
Aarwangen
Schlossaarwangen.JPG
Aarwangen Castle
Aarwangen Castle is located in Switzerland
Aarwangen Castle
Aarwangen Castle
Site information
Owner Canton of Bern
Open to
the public
yes
Site history
Built 1300
Built by Walter von Aarwangen

Aarwangen Castle (German: Schloss Aarwangen) is a castle in the municipality of Aarwangen of the canton of Bern in Switzerland. It is a Swiss heritage site of national significance.[1]

History[edit]

The lords of Aarwangen were first mentioned between 1194 and 1212 as a Ministerialis (unfree knights in the service of a feudal overlord) family in service to the Kyburgs.[2] Starting in 1266, Walter of Aarwangen was in the service of the future King of the Romans Rudolph I. Initially they owned land in the Emmental, but in 1276 they sold the land to Trub monastery. Around 1300 they built the tower of Aarwangen Castle along the banks of the Aar river.[3] In 1313, they were firmly established in Aarwangen when Rudolf III of Neuenburg-Nidau granted them the bridge over the Aar river as a fief. After Walter's death in 1320,[4] his son Johann took over the castle and leadership of the family. Johann was a patron of the Cistercian Abbey of St. Urban in Hasle, Lucerne and in 1341 he joined the Abbey. He remained at the Abbey until his death in 1350, which ended the Aarwangen noble line.[5]

After the Aarwangen family died out, the castle went to the Grünenberg family. They sold it in 1432 to the city of Bern. It served as the seat of the Bernese bailiff until 1798. It is now the administrative seat of the surrounding district.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kantonsliste A-Objekte". KGS Inventar (in German). Federal Office of Civil Protection. 2009. Retrieved 25 April 2011. 
  2. ^ Aarwangen family in German, French and Italian in the online Historical Dictionary of Switzerland.
  3. ^ Burgen.ch (German) accessed 24 April 2012
  4. ^ Walter of Aarwangen in German, French and Italian in the online Historical Dictionary of Switzerland.
  5. ^ Johann of Aarwangen in German, French and Italian in the online Historical Dictionary of Switzerland.

External links[edit]