Abère

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Abère
Eglise d'Abère.JPG
Abère is located in France
Abère
Abère
Coordinates: 43°23′26″N 0°10′28″W / 43.3906°N 0.1744°W / 43.3906; -0.1744Coordinates: 43°23′26″N 0°10′28″W / 43.3906°N 0.1744°W / 43.3906; -0.1744
Country France
Region Aquitaine
Department Pyrénées-Atlantiques
Arrondissement Pau
Canton Morlaàs
Intercommunality Pays de Morlaàs
Government
 • Mayor (2014–2020) Myriam Cuillet
Area1 5.81 km2 (2.24 sq mi)
Population (2009)2 147
 • Density 25/km2 (66/sq mi)
INSEE/Postal code 64002 / 64160
Elevation 239–346 m (784–1,135 ft)
(avg. 335 m or 1,099 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Abère is a French commune in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department in the Aquitaine region of south-western France.

Geography[edit]

The Church of St. John the Baptist
Memorial to the war dead of Abère
The Abère public hall.
The Pyrénées from Abère.

Location[edit]

Abère is located some 22 km north-east of Pau and some 9 km north-east of Morlaas. The D7 road (Route de Vic) heading east from Saint-Jammes passes through the southern portion of the commune and continues to Baleix. Access to the village is by the Chemin de Lapoutge going north from the D7 for about 6 km. The Highway D207 coming south from Simacourbe forms the eastern boundary of the commune. The commune is mostly farmland with forests in the north and east[1]

Hydrography[edit]

Located in the Drainage basin of the Adour, the Grand Léez river forms the western border of the commune with the Arriutort joining it at the northern tip of the commune and forming the north-eastern border of the commune.

Localities and hamlets[2][edit]

  • Bartot
  • Berducq
  • Bordenave
  • Briscoulet
  • Courde
  • Crouquet
  • Hourcade
  • Labat
  • Larré
  • Piarrette
  • Salabert
  • La Teulère[3]

Neighbouring communes and towns[1][edit]

Toponymy[edit]

The name Abère was mentioned in the tenth century[4] (according to Pierre de Marca[5]) and appeared in the forms:

  • Oere and Bere (1385[4] Census of Béarn[6]),
  • Vere and Avere (1385[7] Census of Morlaàs, but uncertain if it is the same locality[7]),
  • Oeyre was mentioned in 1487[4] Registry of Béarnais businesses.[8]
  • Abere appears on the Cassini Map of 1750[7][9] and in the 1790 map,[10] Bulletin of Laws.

Michel Grosclaude[7] proposed a latin etymology of abellana or abella, derived from the Béarnais abera (according to Brigitte Jobbé-Duval.[11]), which means "hazelnut" and by extension "the hazel copse"

The commune's name in Béarnais is Avera.

History[edit]

Paul Raymond[4] noted that in 1385, there were 8 fires in Abère and that it depended on the bailiwick of Pau. A barony was created in 1672, a vassal of the Viscounts of Béarn. The commune was part of the Archdiocese of Vic-Bihl, which in turn depended on the Diocese of Lescar of which Lembeye was the capital.[12]

Its Lay Abbey, Logo monument historique - rouge sans texte.svg[13] the house of Bosom d'Abadie is mentioned in 1385.

Administration[edit]

List of Successive Mayors of Abère[14]

From To Name Party Position
1995 2008 Jean-Pierre Lortet
2008 2014 Claude Conte-Hourticq
2014 2020 Myriam Cuillet

(Not all data is known)

Intercommunality[edit]

Abère is a member of three inter-communal organisations:[15]

  • the community of communes of the Pays de Morlaàs
  • the AEP Union for the Luy and Gabas Regions
  • the energy Union of the Pyrénées-Atlantiques

Demographics[edit]

In 2010 the commune had 147 inhabitants. The evolution of the number of inhabitants is known through the population censuses conducted in the town since 1793. From the 21st century a census of municipalities with fewer than 10,000 inhabitants is held every five years, unlike larger towns that have a sample survey every year.[Note 1][Note 2]

Evolution of the Population (See database)
1793 1800 1806 1821 1831 1836 1841 1846 1851
296 199 256 194 170 259 285 272 291
1856 1861 1866 1872 1876 1881 1886 1891 1896
261 264 257 230 247 238 225 226 201
1901 1906 1911 1921 1926 1931 1936 1946 1954
212 196 200 180 160 154 165 154 149
1962 1968 1975 1982 1990 1999 2006 2007 2008
150 140 133 132 123 133 144 142 146
2009 2010 - - - - - - -
147 147 - - - - - - -

Sources : Ldh/EHESS/Cassini until 1962, INSEE database from 1968 (population without double counting and municipal population from 2006)


Population of Abère

Culture and Heritage[edit]

Civil heritage[edit]

Several structures are listed as historical monuments in the commune. These are:

  • Tile factory at la TeulèreLogo monument historique - rouge sans texte.svg[3]
  • Former Lay Abbey: the Bosom d'AbadieLogo monument historique - rouge sans texte.svg[13]
  • Town Hall (former Presbytery) (19th century)Logo monument historique - rouge sans texte.svg[16]
  • Chateau of Bordenave d'Abère (1732)Logo monument historique - rouge sans texte.svg[17]
  • Menyucq House farm (1841)Logo monument historique - rouge sans texte.svg[18]
  • Houses and Farms (19th century)Logo monument historique - rouge sans texte.svg[19]

Religious Heritage[edit]

  • The Church of St. John the Baptist (16th century)Logo monument historique - rouge sans texte.svg[20] The church contains several historical objects. These are:
    • Processional Cross (17th century)Logo monument historique - noir sans texte.svg[21]
    • Altar CrossLogo monument historique - noir sans texte.svg[22]
    • Painting: Christ on the Cross with Saint John, the Virgin, and Saint John the Baptist (18th century)Logo monument historique - noir sans texte.svg[23]
    • Baptismal Fonts (12th century)Logo monument historique - noir sans texte.svg[24]
    • 4 Altar CandlesticksLogo monument historique - noir sans texte.svg[25]
    • 2 statues: Angels holding a column and a scaleLogo monument historique - noir sans texte.svg[26]
    • TabernacleLogo monument historique - noir sans texte.svg[27]
    • Altar (18th century)Logo monument historique - noir sans texte.svg[28]
    • Altar, Tabernacle, and 4 Candlesticks at the secondary altarLogo monument historique - noir sans texte.svg[29]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ At the beginning of the 21st century, the methods of identification have been modified by law No. 2002-276 of 27 February 2002 [1], the so-called "law of local democracy" and in particular Title V "census operations" which allow, after a transitional period running from 2004 to 2008, the annual publication of the legal population of the different French administrative districts. For municipalities with a population greater than 10,000 inhabitants, a sample survey is conducted annually, the entire territory of these municipalities is taken into account at the end of the period of five years. The first "legal population" after 1999 under this new law came into force in 1 January 2009 and was based on the census of 2006.
  2. ^ In the census table, by convention in Wikipedia, and to allow a fair comparison between five yearly censuses, the principle has been retained for subsequent legal populations since 1999 displayed in the census table that shows populations for the years 2006, 2011, 2016, etc, as well as the latest legal population published by INSEE

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Google Maps
  2. ^ Géoportail, IGN, consulted on 14 October 2011 (French)
  3. ^ a b Ministry of Culture, Mérimée IA00027108 Tile Factory (French)
  4. ^ a b c d Topographic Dictionary of the Department of Basses-Pyrenees, Paul Raymond, Imprimerie nationale, 1863, Digitised from Lyon Public Library 15 June 2011, p. 2 (French)
  5. ^ Pierre de Marca, History of Béarn p. 268 (French)
  6. ^ Manuscript of the 14th century - Departmental Archives of Pyrénées-Atlantiques (French)
  7. ^ a b c d Michel Grosclaude, Toponymic Dictionary of communes, Béarn, Edicions reclams & Édition Cairn - 2006, 416 pages, ISBN 2 35068 005 3, p. 214 (French)
  8. ^ Manuscripts of the 15th and 16th centuries - Departmental Archives of Pyrénées-Atlantiques (French)
  9. ^ Cassini Map 1750 - Abère
  10. ^ Cassini Map 1790 - Abère
  11. ^ Brigitte Jobbé-Duval, Dictionary of place names - Pyrénées-Atlantiques, 2009, Archives and Culture, ISBN 978-2-35077-151-9
  12. ^ Topographic Dictionary of the Department of Basses-Pyrenees, p. 174
  13. ^ a b Ministry of Culture, Mérimée IA00027107 Lay Abbey (French)
  14. ^ List of Mayors of France (French)
  15. ^ Intercommunalité des Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Cellule informatique préfecture 64, consulted on 9 November 2011
  16. ^ Ministry of Culture, Mérimée IA00027106 Town Hall (Presbytery) (French)
  17. ^ Ministry of Culture, Mérimée IA00027105 Chateau of Bordenave d'Abère (French)
  18. ^ Ministry of Culture, Mérimée IA00027103 Menyucq House (French)
  19. ^ Ministry of Culture, Mérimée IA00027102 Houses and Farms (French)
  20. ^ Ministry of Culture, Mérimée IA00027104 Church of St. John the Baptist (French)
  21. ^ Ministry of Culture, Palissy IA64000446 Processional Cross (French)
  22. ^ Ministry of Culture, Palissy IA64000445 Altar Cross (French)
  23. ^ Ministry of Culture, Palissy IA64000444 Painting: Christ on the Cross (French)
  24. ^ Ministry of Culture, Palissy IA64000443 Baptismal Fonts (French)
  25. ^ Ministry of Culture, Palissy IA64000442 4 Altar Candlesticks (French)
  26. ^ Ministry of Culture, Palissy IA64000441 2 Statues of angels (French)
  27. ^ Ministry of Culture, Palissy IA64000440 Tabernacle (French)
  28. ^ Ministry of Culture, Palissy IA64000439 Carved wood Altar (French)
  29. ^ Ministry of Culture, Palissy IM64000438 Altar, Tabernacle, 4 Candlesticks (French)