Abas (mythology)

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In Greek mythology, the name Abas (Greek: Ἄβας; gen.: Ἄβαντος) is attributed to several individuals:

  • Abas, the son of Poseidon and Arethusa.[1] A Thracian by birth, Abas founded a tribe known as the Abantians or Abantes. Abas and his Abantian followers migrated to the island of Euboea, where he subsequently reigned as king. He was father of Canethus[2] and Chalcodon, and through the latter grandfather of Elephenor, who is known to have accidentally killed him.[3] Also given as Abas' children are Alcon, Arethusa and Dias, of whom the latter was said to have founded a city Athenae on Euboea.[4]
  • Abas, a son of Metaneira who was changed by Demeter into a lizard, because he mocked the goddess when she had come on her wanderings into the house of her mother, and drank eagerly to quench her thirst.[10] Other traditions relate the same story of a boy, Ascalabus, and call his mother Misme.[11]
  • Abas, a defender of Thebes against the Seven. He and his sons Cydon and Argus were killed in the battle.[12]

In the Aeneid, the name Abas belongs to two companions of Aeneas:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 157
  2. ^ Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1. 79
  3. ^ Tzetzes on Lycophron, 1034
  4. ^ Stephanus of Byzantium s. v. Athēnai
  5. ^ Bibliotheca 1. 9. 13
  6. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 14
  7. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1. 43. 5
  8. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5. 126
  9. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses, 14. 505
  10. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses, 5. 450
  11. ^ Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses, 23
  12. ^ Statius, Thebaid, 7. 646; 9. 758
  13. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses, 12. 306
  14. ^ Homer, Iliad, 5. 148
  15. ^ Quintus Smyrnaeus, Fall of Troy, 11. 81

Sources[edit]