Abd Allah ibn Abd al-Latif Al ash-Sheikh

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Abd Allah ibn Abd al-Latif Al ash-Sheikh (1848–1921) was an Islamic scholar from Saudi Arabia and was the grandfather of King Faisal of Saudi Arabia.

Background[edit]

Ibrahim ibn Muhammad Al ash-Sheikh was born in 1848 into the noted family of Saudi religious scholars, the Al ash-Sheikh, descendants of Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab.[1]

Career[edit]

Abd Allah bin Abd al-Latif was the leader of the Saudi ulema at the end of the 19th century. He was the teacher of Ibn Saud, later King Abdulaziz, concerning the principles of the Islamic jurisprudence and monotheism.[2] In 1892, the Saudi state was destroyed by their rivals, the Al Rashid of Ha'il and the Saudi leadership went into exile. Rather than going into exile as well, Abd Allah bin Abd al-Latif sided with the Al-Rashid and moved to Ha'il.[3] The Al Saud returned from exile in 1902 under the leadership of Abdulaziz Al Saud (later Saudi Arabia's first King) and re-established the Saudi state around Riyadh.[4] Abd Allah bin Abd al-Latif then changed sides again and re-joined the Al Saud, a change of heart which was accepted by Abdul Aziz.[3]

Abd Allah bin Abd al-Latif remained as leader of the Saudi religious establishment until his death in 1921.[1]

Relationship with Saudi Royal family[edit]

In 1902, his daughter, Tarfa bint Abdullah married Abdulaziz Al Saud. Their son, Faisal, later became King of Saudi Arabia. Tarfa died in 1912.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Commins, David Dean (2006). The Wahhabi mission and Saudi Arabia. p. 210. ISBN 1-84511-080-3. 
  2. ^ "Riyadh. The capital of monotheism". Business and Finance Group. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c Bligh, Alexander (1985). "The Saudi religious elite (Ulama) as participant in the political system of the kingdom.". International Journal of Middle East Studies 17: 37–50. doi:10.1017/S0020743800028750. 
  4. ^ "Saudi Arabia". Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. Archived from the original on 29 June 2011. Retrieved 7 June 2011.