Abdi İpekçi Street

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Abdi İpekçi Street
Abdi İpekçi Caddesi
Abdi İpekçi Caddesi.jpg
Former name(s) Emlak Caddesi
Length 700 m (2,300 ft)
Postal code 34367
Location Maçka-Nişantaşı, Şişli, Istanbul, Turkey
Coordinates 41°03′00″N 28°59′30″E / 41.04991°N 28.99168°E / 41.04991; 28.99168Coordinates: 41°03′00″N 28°59′30″E / 41.04991°N 28.99168°E / 41.04991; 28.99168
From Bayıldım Caddesi
Major
junctions
Mim Kemal Öke Caddesi, Bronz Sokak, Atiye Sokak, Teşvikiye Bostanı Sokak, Eytam Caddesi, Altın Sokak and Profesör Doktor Feyzi Feyzioğlu Sokak
To Vali Konağı Caddesi
The memorial for Abdi İpekçi on the street.

Abdi İpekçi Street or Abdi İpekçi Avenue (Turkish: Abdi İpekçi Caddesi) is the premier shopping street of İstanbul, Turkey, located in Şişli district. It runs along the Maçka and Teşvikiye neighborhoods, extending from Bayıldım Caddesi/Maçka Caddesi to Vali Konağı Caddesi in the Nişantaşı quarter, crossing Mim Kemal Öke Caddesi, Bronz Sokak, Atiye Sokak, Teşvikiye Bostanı Sokak, Eytam Caddesi, Altın Sokak and Profesör Doktor Feyzi Feyzioğlu Sokak on its length of around 700 m in generally northern direction.

During the last decade, the street in the prestigious neighborhood developed into a place hosting luxury retail shopping venues. With a monthly lease price of about $3500 m², it is currently the most expensive street for retail stores in Turkey.[1] A variety of exclusive and expensive shops offering Turkish and international designer labels, restaurants of international cuisine and cafés are lined up on both sides of the street.

The street was renamed after Abdi İpekçi, the renowned journalist and the editor-in-chief of the major Turkish newspaper Milliyet. İpekçi was murdered on February 1, 1979 in his car in front of his apartment residence in this street by Mehmet Ali Ağca, who later became famous for his failed assassination attempt on Pope John Paul II. A memorial near the place, where he was murdered, was revealed in 2000.[2]

Some of the many shops include:

New Year celebration[edit]

Open-air New Year's Eve welcome in the decorated street is newly becoming traditional as an alternative to the celebration at the more crowded Taksim Square.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dilek Taş (October 1, 2009). "Alışveriş caddelerinde kiralar yüzde 25 geriledi". Sabah. Retrieved 2011-09-20.  (Turkish).
  2. ^ Newspaper Milliyet on January 31, 2000 (Turkish).
  3. ^ My Net on January 1, 2007 (Turkish).