Abdul Hakim Ansari

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Khawja Abdul Hakeem Ansari
Founder of Silselah-i-Tauheediyah
Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari.jpg
Born Abdul Hakeem Ansari
July 29, 1893
Farid Abad near Delhi
Died January 23, 1977
Lahore, Pakistan
Resting place
Aastana Aalia Tauheediyah, 92-G, Model Town, Lahore, Pakistan
Known for Sufism, Toheedia
Notable work(s) Tameer-i-millat, Chiragh-i-Rah, Tareeqat-e-Tauheediyah, Haqeeqat Wahdatul Wajood
Religion Islam
Children Son: Abdul Hadi Ansari
Daughters: Shams-un-Nahar Baigum, Rabia Baigum, Humayun Baigum
Parents Father: Hafiz Abdur Raheem
Mother: Syeda Umat-ul-Aisha
Brother: Abdul Aleem Ansari
Sister: Rafeea Baigum
Website
http://www.tauheediyah.com/

Abdul Hakeem Ansari (Urdu خواجه عبدالحكيم انصاري) (July 29, 1893 – January 23, 1977), Naqshbandi, Chishti, Mujaddadi, Tauheedi was a Sufi[1] (ثصوف) of the Naqshbandiya, Chishti Orders. He studied other doctrines of spiritual thought. A student of Risaldar Muhammad Hanif Khan, who "aligned him with the Vision of Allah" on Uwaisi pattern,[2] he founded the fifth spiritual discipline as Tauheediyah school.[3]

Life[edit]

Family[edit]

Born at Farid Abad near Delhi on July 29, 1893, his father was Hafiz Abdur Raheem and his mother Syeda Umat-ul-Aisha. His grand father Maulana Abdul Aziz (مولانا عبدالعزيز) was a religious leader, a well-educated Senior Sub-Judge at Lakhnao. His forefathers belonged to the 'Ansari' family from the Panipat, the successors of Abu Ayub Ansari[4] (حضرت ابوايوب انصاري).
His maternal grandfathers[clarification needed] were from the family of Naseer uddin Shah Roshan Chiragh, successor of Farid Ganj Shakar. They lived in Bally Maran, Delhi.

He had a younger brother, Abdul Aleem Ansari, and a sister, Rafeea Baigum (died on February 22, 1997). In his childhood, he played at the shrine of Naseer uddin Shah Roshan Chiragh. His childhood passed in the company of his grandfather Maulana Abdul Aziz.[5] His grandfather taught him the basics of Islam. He learned prayers, creeds and verses of the Holy Quran by the age of five. He passed his matriculation, the Munshi Fazil examination and became a graduate with training as a librarian.

Marital life[edit]

He was married to his first cousin. His uncle was the Ali Garh University Alumni. He had a son, Abdul Hadi Ansari, and three daughters, Shams-un-Nahar Baigum, Rabia Baigum, and Humayun Baigum. Shams-un-Nahar Baigum was the eldest while Humayun Baigum was youngest child.[6] Abdul Hadi Ansari died at the age of thirty six[7] and was buried at Miani Sahib graveyard. He adopted his nephew Anwer Aleem Ansari after the death of his son. Shams-un-Nahar Baigum was married to Khwaja Fakhr ul Hasan and lived at Karachi. Rabia Baigum was married to Islam Uddin and settled at Lahore after marriage while youngest daughter Humayan Baigum was married to Sheikh Imtiaz Ali Qureshi (Aafaqi) and settled at Islamabad they have 6 children 3 boys and 3 girls.Muqtadar Awali ,mustansar domi and mubashar somi ,And girls are Farzana Fazli ,durdana ukhri and sabiha shukri. His wife was known as Nani Amman (ناني امان) in the community of his disciples. She migrated from Karachi to Islam Abad in 1962 with her daughter Humayun Baigum. She was died at Lahore on April 15, 1965 and buried at F Block, Model Town graveyard.[8]

Business and jobs[edit]

He had been living at a forest near Delhi for a business, buying fossils sold by the villagers.[9] Afterwards, he was appointed as translator at Indian Army Headquarters Delhi, where he spent most of the time during this job. His residence was at Government A class Army Headquarters Tegoor Road Delhi. He served at Bulgam temporarily. This service continued until he emigrated to Pakistan with his family.
He secured a job as librarian at Pakistan Air Force Base Drig Road (later Shahrah-e-Faisal) Karachi. Soon he transferred to Maleer cantonment library Karachi. He resigned in January 1955 for permanent settlement to Bannu.[10]

Spiritual life[edit]

Spiritual trends[edit]

He was inclined towards Sufism in childhood influenced by the company of his grandfather—Maulana Abdul Aziz, and studied many books on the subject from the personal library of Maulana Abdul Aziz, who died in 1902.[11][12]

Practical spiritual journey[edit]

Naqshbandiya-Mujaddidiya and Chishtia Chain have early contributions in his practical spiritual journey. He could not achieve the final objective of his life—the closeness and vision of Allah. Finally he got that in the friendship of Risaldar Muhammad Hanif Khan.[13]

Oath of allegiance in Naqshbandiya-Mujaddidiya[edit]

He met Maulana Kareem uddin Ahmad after eight years of search. He took the oath of allegiance on his hand on 1911 at the age of eighteen years. Maulana Kareem uddin Ahmad advised him the Zikr and other practices for daily life. He followed them and tried to complete them, but as a result failed twice in his academic matriculation, which he eventually completed after seven to eight years. Maulana Kareem uddin Ahmad bestowed him with the written statement ‘to take oath for himself’ in the age of thirty three. In addition, he advised him not to take oath before the age of forty. Maulana Kareem uddin Ahmad suggested meditation. He performed as per instructions till the death of Maulana Kareem uddin Ahmad on 1920. He had been attached with Naqshbandiya-Mujaddidiya chain of spiritual thought for nine years. In the early six years he met Maulana Kareem uddin Ahmad ten to fifteen times but attached firmly to his teachings.[13]

Oath of allegiance in Chishtia chain[edit]

After the death of Maulana Kareem uddin Ahmad he took oath of allegiance in Chishtia Chain on the hand of saint Syed Muhammad Qasim Ali Kaleemi who was a resident of Murad Abad. He completed his course in five to six years. He met twice to his spiritual guide in Chishtia Chain in more or less ten years.[13]

Search for the destination[edit]

He did not took oath of allegiance in any discipline of spiritual thought after Naqshbandiya-Mujaddidiya order and Chishtia Chain. He thoroughly studied the courses of Qadiriyyah and other spiritual disciplines.[13]

Risaldar Muhammad Hanif Khan

Friendship with Risaldar Muhammad Hanif Khan[edit]

After complete silence of fourteen to fifteen years, he met Risaldar Muhammad Hanif Khan in 1928 at Balgam. Risaldar Muhammad Hanif Khan was the resident of the small town Mahinder Garh, Patyala state. Risaldar Muhammad Hanif Khan was an Owaisi saint; he had not made an oath of allegiance or owed allegiance to any person. The era of this direct friendship is of nineteen years. It is said that he passed the entire way from Nasoot to Zaat-i-Beht seeing and understanding the surroundings all around; first he saw the stages of Hell, and in the succeeding order and moving about the heavens of A’raf, Malakoot, Jabroot, Lahoot, and Hahoot then reached the lower layer of Hoo. At this point he overcame the state of Wahdatul Wajood. This was the state that has been described as reality by Ibn Arabi. When he reached the upper layer of Hoo, he experienced the state which has been called as Zilliyat by Hazrat Mujaddid Alf-i-Sani. After that he remained for some time in A’dam but continued proceeding forward till by crossing A’dam entered Alam-i-Amr. At last, after twenty six to twenty seven years he achieved his life's desire in 1953. During this period, he continued reflecting and reciting of his older Naqshbandiya order and did get grace from Risaldar Muhammad Hanif Khan.[13]

Life in Pakistan[edit]

Cross border migration[edit]

After the independence of Pakistan in 1947, law and order situation was at the worst level. He went to the embassy of Pakistan at Delhi and migrated from Delhi to Lahore by train on September 14, 1947. This journey from Nizam uddin railway station to Lahore was of fire and blood[clarification needed]. His stay at Lahore migrant camp was of two week from where he came to his relatives at Karachi.[14]

Stay at Karachi[edit]

His first stay at Karachi was with his cousin for some time. After that He shifted to the residence of his son in law. When he was employed by Pakistan Air Force as librarian then he got residence at Air Force Base camp. Most of the people from his company were from the Pakistan Air Force, and he recruited the majority of his disciples from it. The circles of Zikr became established at almost all cantonments of Pakistan Air Force, and in many cities, towns, and villages.[10]

Stay at Bannu[edit]

Settlement Commissioner at Bannu, at that time, had some relation with him who invited him many times. He visited Bannu and lived with him for a month. Settlement Commissioner inquired about his claims and allotment on them. He did not have allotted anything on his claims. He provided his claims for allotment afterwards on the demand of that settlement commissioner who ordered to allot him a house at Qasaban Ward of Bannu with a cash of five thousand rupees. During his stay with the Settlement Commissioner he was introduced with Abdus Sattar. Abdus Sattar liked him and became his disciple. Allotted house was not vacant yet and the Settlement Commissioner was transferred from Bannu. Abdus Sattar offered him to stay with him at his family house – Shanti Bhawan. Indian parliament is called ‘Bhawan’. This house was pre-occupied where the close relatives of Abdus Sattar were also living with them.
He shifted to his allotted house in 1962 and invited Abdus Sattar to stay with him. Abdus Sattar accepted this offer and shifted with him along with his wife and a daughter. This house at Qasaban ward was very small with two rooms and a drawing room having stairs for toilet at the roof. Abdus Sattar served him with his family during his stay at Bannu.[15]

Stay at Lahore[edit]

He sold his house at Bannu and left for Lahore on October 1964. Abdus Sattar with his wife and daughter also joined him for his settlement at Lahore. His earlier stay was at Fazal building and at cantonment residences but later he shifted at Gulberg Lahore. He lived there for nine years. In 1973 he came at the Model Town residence with Abdus Sattar, his wife and daughter. He remained there until his death.

Foundation of Silsilah-i-Tauheediyah[edit]

He never liked to be known as a saint. He became famous during his job as Librarian at Karachi. His colleagues and friends were convinced of his wisdom. They started consulting him for their life problems. He advises them good deeds and prays for them. Some people insisted him for practical spiritual journey. Thus, few from those people took oath of allegiance at his hand on 1950. His stay was at Karachi and his social circle was in Pakistan Air Force. Very soon the circles of Zikr were established at all bases of Pakistan Air Force. His teachings spread across the cities, towns and villages by these people. He laid down the foundation of his Silsilah on 1953 at Karachi[16] and name Toheedia (Touheedia, Tawhidia, Tawhidyah, توحيديه).

Litrary contributions[edit]

Taameer-i-millat[edit]

His comprehensive book on spiritualism that described the distinct preview of spiritual journey from earth to heaven published on 1957. This book introduced the concept of 'vision of Allah' before death, first time in human history. Further more it defines the means and procedure for the 'vision of Allah'.[17][18]

Chiragh-i-Rah[edit]

This book is the collection of his speeches. Its first edition was published on 1967 and second on 1977. It explains the concept and issues on the way of light.[17][19]

Tareeqat-i-Tauheediyah[edit]

This book has distinction of its contents on Sufism. Any founder of Silsilah did not write the full contents of his Sufi order. He was the first who completely wrote the full contents and proceeding of his spiritual discipline on 1962.[17][18]

Haqeeqat Wahdatul Wajood[edit]

Wahdatul Wajood emerged as a spiritual conflict in Sufi world. Many Sufis and theoligians wrote on the subject but a minute number of them described it after their spiritual experience. He was one of them who described the reality of Wahdatul Wajood on 1969.[17][19]

Muhammad Siddique Dar Tauheedi (Second successor of Silselah-i-Tauheediyah)

List of authorized persons[edit]

Authorized person is one who has excellent morality and spiritual power and has capacity to bestow grace to those who are under his supervision, and can understand and remove the spiritual hurdles of the disciples of his spiritual guide. Few selected persons are declared, in writing by the spiritual leader, to be eligible for the purpose. These authorized persons can take oath of allegiance on their hand for their spiritual leader rather than for themselves.
He declared the following persons as his 'Authorized persons':[20]
1. Abdus Sattar Awan[16][21]
2. Muhammad Siddique Dar[22]
3. Muhammad Murtaza[23]
4. Sheikh Ali Asghar
5. Abid Ali[24]
6. Choudhry Ghulam Qadir
7. Raja Ali Akber
8. Qazi Gayoor Ahmad Ansari
9. Malik Bukshish Ilahi[25]
10. Syed Atta Ullah Shah

Qibla Abdus Sattar Khan (First successor of Silselah-i-Tauheediyah)

Announcement of successor[edit]

He consulted his authorized persons for the succession. Finally he decided for Abdus Sattar Awan to be his successor.[21][26] He announced his decision of succession during his speech at the annual convention of Silsilah Alia-e-Toheedia at Lahore on 1968. He ordered all his disciples to take oath of allegiance of his caliphate at the same meeting. Some mjazeen had adverse react on his announcement and they did not act upon his advice.[26]

Annual conventions[edit]

He conducted fifteen annual conventions in his life. The series of annual conventions started on 1959. First four were hosted by his disciples at Noshehra Virkan. He gave his first annual address in the fourth convention. Another annual convention on 1966 was also at this town. Three annual conventions were conducted at Multan. Six annual conventions were at Lahore – five conventions at Prince Hotel Lahore and one at the Astana-e-Aalia Toheedia – his residence at Model town Lahore.Muhammad Siddique Dar read his annual address at the single annual convention at Astana-e-Aalia Toheedia on 1974 in compliance of his orders. Another annual convention was conducted at Sheikhupura that was incomplete due to heavy rain.[27]

Astana-i-Tauheediyah[edit]

Silsilah-i-Tauheediyah had no place to serve as a headquarters. His disciples insisted and proposed the idea of a society for the collection of monetary resources to visualize the dream of a headquarters at Lahore. They contributed and bought a piece of land at B Block Model Town. Soon they sold it and bought another piece of land of six canals that was of 92-G, Model Town Lahore. They presented him the proposed design of Silselah-i-Tauheediyah for final approval on 1971. He approved this design and construction started on it that completed in three steps. First step ended on 1973 and he shifted there with Abdus Sattar, his wife and daughter. All the three steps of construction completed till 1977.[28] He declared Astana-e-Aaliah Toheedia to be the official residence of the president Silsielah-i-Tauheediyah for all successors on their turn as the personal property of non of them and a center of all activities under control of the president Silsilah-i-Tauheediyah.[16] Astana Alia Toheedia became a place to serve all disciples and guests in search of the teachings of Toheedia doctrine. One annual convention of Silsilah-i-Tauheediyah was conducted there on 1974 in his life.[29]

Death[edit]

He recorded his will on May 25, 1975 with retired Justice Rustum S. Sidhwa who registered it in court.[16][30] Ansari died on January 23, 1977 and was buried at 92-G, Model Town Lahore. Abdus Sattar took oath of allegiance as his successor after his death.[31]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.toheedia.net/founder.htm
  2. ^ Siddique Dar Toheedi, Muhammad (July 1999). "Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari". Falah-e-Admiat. 2:26
  3. ^ Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja (1962). Tareeqat-e-Toheedia (طريقت ثوحيديه). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.4
  4. ^ Siddique Dar Toheedi, Muhammad (July 1999). "Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari". Falah-e-Admiat. 2:22
  5. ^ Siddique Dar Toheedi, Muhammad (July 1999). "Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari". Falah-e-Admiat. 2:23
  6. ^ Siddique Dar Toheedi, Muhammad (July 1999). "Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari". Falah-e-Admiat. 2:27
  7. ^ Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja (1962). Tareeqat-e-Toheedia (طريقت ثوحيديه). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.20
  8. ^ Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.56-57
  9. ^ Siddique Dar Toheedi, Muhammad (April 2001). "Jungle Course". Falah-e-Admiat. 4:20-21
  10. ^ a b Siddique Dar Toheedi, Muhammad (July 1999). "Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari". Falah-e-Admiat. 2:26-27
  11. ^ Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja (1967). Chiragh-e-Rah (جراغ راه). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.8
  12. ^ Siddique Dar Toheedi, Muhammad (October 2004). "Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari". Falah-e-Admiat. 2:22-23
  13. ^ a b c d e Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja (1969). Reality of Wahdatul Wajood (حقيقت وحدت الوجود). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.12-13
  14. ^ Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja (1967). Chiragh-e-Rah (جراغ راه). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.209-211
  15. ^ Siddique Dar Toheedi, Muhammad (July 1999). "Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari". Falah-e-Admiat. 2:27-28
  16. ^ a b c d Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja v. Silsilah-i-Tauheediyah, May 25, 1975. Will registered to the Registrar Joint Stock Companies Lahore, Toheedia Library. (Manuscript Collection), Gujranwala: Markaz Taameer-i-millat.
  17. ^ a b c d http://www.toheedia.net/books.htm
  18. ^ a b Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.59
  19. ^ a b Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.60
  20. ^ Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.61-62
  21. ^ a b http://www.toheedia.net/fotogallery.htm
  22. ^ Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja (1961). [Letter to Muhammad Siddique Dar Toheedi]. Toheedia Library. (Manuscript Collection), Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat
  23. ^ Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja (1961). [Letter to Muhammad Murtaza]. Toheedia Library. (Manuscript Collection), Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat
  24. ^ Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja (1961). [Letter to Abid Ali]. Toheedia Library. (Manuscript Collection), Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat
  25. ^ Abdul Hakeem Ansari, Khawaja (1962). [Letter to Bukshish Ilahi]. Toheedia Library. (Manuscript Collection), Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat
  26. ^ a b Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.62-63
  27. ^ Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.63-66
  28. ^ Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.66-67
  29. ^ Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.65
  30. ^ Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.68
  31. ^ Ali Raza, Mian (Ed.). (2010). Farmoodaat-e-Faqeer: Malfozat-o-Maktobat Hazrat Khawaja Abdul Hakeem Ansari. (فرمودات فقير:ملفوظات و مكتوبات حضرت خواجه عبدالححكيم انصاري). Gujranwala: Markaz Tameer-e-Millat. P.70-71