Abe Goldstein

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Abe Goldstein (September 10, 1898 – February 12, 1977) was an American boxer. He was World Bantamweight Champion in 1924, and was ranked the #5 bantamweight of all time

Boxing career[edit]

Goldstein turned professional in 1916 at the age of 17, and lost only once in his first 40 fights, which included 16 knockout victories. Goldstein was 5'5", and fought in the 112–120 pound range.

By 1921 he was a contender and in March Goldstein received his first title shot. Against American flyweight champion Johnny Buff, Goldstein was knocked out in the 2nd round. After his loss, he went undefeated in his next 19 fights until losing a 10-round decision to Johnny Sheppard in April 1922.

Seven months later, Goldstein received another shot at the American flyweight title, but lost again, this time, to Pancho Villa in a 15-round decision. Goldstein bounced back, and did not lose in his next 15 fights, and went undefeated in 19 of 20 bouts before receiving another title shot in 1924.

He faced Joe Lynch, the world bantamweight champion, who had knocked Goldstein out in the 11th round in November 1920 (it was Goldstein's second career loss). When they fought again in March 1924, however, Goldstein won the title when he defeated Lynch in a 15-round decision.

Goldstein successfully defended the title twice (July 16 against Charles Ledoux and September 8 against Tommy Ryan), and held the title for nine months before losing to Eddie "Cannonball" Martin in a 15-round decision on December 19, 1924. Over the next three years, Goldstein continued to fight the top bantamweight boxers in the world, though he did not receive another title shot. He also defeated Hall of Famer Panama Al Brown in a 10-round decision in April 1926.

Among those whom Goldstein defeated during his career were Willie LaMorte, Earl Puryear, Frankie Coster, Joe Burman, and Joe Lynch. He is considered one of the best counterpunchers ever, and often won his victories with that skill.[1] Goldstein retired in 1927 with a professional record of 89 victories (30 knockouts), 5 draws, 13 losses, and 22 no decisions.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Abe Goldstein". Ootpdevelopments.com. Retrieved January 20, 2011. 

External links[edit]