Abed Azrie

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Abed Azrie
Abed-Azrie-1.jpg
Background information
Native name عابد عازرية
Born 1945 (age 68–69)
Aleppo, Syria
Genres Arabic music
Occupations Musician
Years active 1990s–present
Website http://www.abed-azrie.com

Abed Azrie or Abed Azrié (Arabic: عابد عازرية‎) (born 1945 in Aleppo) is a French singer and composer[1] who performs Classical music in a variety of languages, including Arabic, English, French, German, Spanish, and other.[1] He describes his works as not belonging to any particular music tradition.[2] In his work he sets ancient and modern Arabic, Sumerian, and other West Asian texts to traditional instruments (such as the ney, kanun, darbuka, violin, flute and lute), and synthesizers.[2][3]

He was born in Aleppo, and after living for a time in Beirut moved to Paris at the age of 22 where he studied Western classical music. While there he translated classical poetry, such as the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh, into French.[4] He has stated that he prefers to live in the West, saying in a 2000 interview that he has an "inability to work in the Arab countries, in which the way people live is still conditioned by halal and haram. Here I can produce contemporary art, I can work in freedom, and there is 'motion' around what I produce: journalism, concerts, programme…Nobody tells me to write a song for a specific political occasion."[5]

His music has been featured in the films Al Leja, directed by Ryad Chaia,[6] Elia Suleiman's Chronicle of a Disappearance.[7] and Florence Strauss's "Between Two Notes" 2006

Discography[edit]

  • 1990: Aromates[8]
  • 1994: Epopée de Gilgamesh
  • 1996: Lapis Lazuli[9]
  • 1999: Pour enfants seulement
  • 1999: Omar Khayyam[10]
  • 2001: Venessia - sung in Venetian dialect.
  • 2006: Suerte Live
  • 2007: Chants d'amour et d'ivresse (Live A Radio France)
  • 2008: Mystique - Sufi poems
  • 2009: Évangile selon Jean oratorio in Arabic, 2CD[11]
  • 2010: Satie En Orient with Ensemble Sarband
  • 2011: Epopée De Gilgamesh (New Recording 2011)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Abed Azrié Biographie". Retrieved 2014-06-08. 
  2. ^ a b Linafelt, Tod (2000). Surviving Lamentations: Catastrophe, Lament, and Protest in the Afterlife. University of Chicago Press. p. 31. ISBN 0-226-48190-5. 
  3. ^ Holden, Stephen (1991-03-20). "The Pop Life". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 2008-01-23. 
  4. ^ Nidel, Richard (2005). World Music: The Basics. Routledge. p. 204. ISBN 0-415-96800-3. 
  5. ^ Rakha, Youssef (2000-07-27). "The francophone predicament". Al-Ahram Weekly. Archived from the original on 14 January 2008. Retrieved 2008-01-23. 
  6. ^ van Gelder, Lawrence (1997-04-01). "An Unforgiving Landscape". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 2008-01-23. 
  7. ^ Janet, Maslin (1997-03-22). "In a Holy Land of Kitsch, Politics and Terrorism". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 2008-01-23. 
  8. ^ Doumtak / Nocturne NTCD1810. Booklet includes Arabic sung texts and English and French translations.
  9. ^ Doumtak / Nocturne NTCD802. Booklet includes Arabic sung texts and English and French translations.
  10. ^ Doumtak / Nocturne NTCD803. Booklet includes Arabic sung texts and English and French translations.
  11. ^ François Bensignor review in French on Mondomix.com Doumtak / Nocturne. Booklet includes Arabic sung texts and English and French translations.