Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge can also refer to the Blair Bridge in Iowa and Nebraska. There is also a Lincoln Memorial Bridge in Vincennes, Indiana.
Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge
I-39lincolnbridge1.jpg
Approaching the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge from the south.
Official name Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge
Carries Four lanes of U.S. 51/I-39
Crosses Illinois River, IL 351, Illinois and Michigan Canal, Iowa Interstate Railroad, and Buzzi Unicem industrial rail lead (the former Illinois Central Railroad mainline).
Locale LaSalle, Illinois and Oglesby, Illinois
Maintained by Illinois Department of Transportation
ID number 000050019120847
Design Through arch
Total length 2,170.8 metres (7,122.0 ft)[1]
Width 4 traffic lanes, 82 ft (25 m)[2]
Longest span 619.9 feet (189 m)[2]
Vertical clearance 19.3 feet (5.88 m)[2]
Opened 1987
Coordinates 41°19′29″N 089°04′37″W / 41.32472°N 89.07694°W / 41.32472; -89.07694

Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge in Illinois is a four-lane bidirectional road bridge that spans the Illinois River, Illinois Route 351, Illinois and Michigan Canal, and local roads and railroads. It carries Interstate 39, a major north-south Interstate through central Illinois, and its U.S. Route counterpart, U.S. Route 51.

Description[edit]

The bridge crosses the river between LaSalle and Oglesby, at river mile 225.8.[3] The structure comprises a main span over the river, flanked by 43 approach spans.It is named after Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth president of the United States. The main span is a through-arch design, 620 feet (189.0 m) long. The clearance of this span over the river, from low steel of the bridge to normal water level in the pool below, is 66.0 feet (20.1 m).[3] With the approach spans, the total length of the structure is 7,120.8 feet (2,170.4 m).

History[edit]

The bridge was built in 1987 when Interstate 39 was first extended south to what is now Illinois Route 251. The highway itself has since been extended all the way to Bloomington-Normal.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Svirsky, Alexander. "Nationalbridges.com". Retrieved 2007-10-22. 
  2. ^ a b c Baughn, James et al. (2005). "Historic Bridges of the Midwest". Retrieved 2006-01-18. 
  3. ^ a b Map no. 89, Illinois Waterway Mile 225.1 to 228, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (1998).
Looking east over the Illinois River on the bridge