Abrakurrie Cave

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Abrakurrie Cave
Location Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia
Coordinates 31°39′26″S 128°29′23″E / 31.6572°S 128.4898°E / -31.6572; 128.4898Coordinates: 31°39′26″S 128°29′23″E / 31.6572°S 128.4898°E / -31.6572; 128.4898
Depth -70m
Length 300+m
Discovery bef. 1930s
Geology Karst
Difficulty easy

Abrakurrie Cave is a wild cave on the Nullarbor Plain in Western Australia. It is located about 48 kilometres (30 mi) north west of Eucla[1] and is reported to have the largest single cave chamber in the southern hemisphere,[2] and that stencils in the cave are the deepest penetration of Aboriginal art of any cave system in Australia.[3]

Visits to the cave occurred as early as the 1880s.[4]

The cave was explored by an expedition led by Captain J. M. Thompson in 1935. The explorers described a cave that was 1,200 feet (366 m) in length, 160 feet (49 m) wide and 150 feet (46 m) deep.[5] After progressing a further 250 feet (76 m) the group found the passage forked into two passages one of which continued a further 1,500 feet (457 m) leading to a huge cavern.[5]

Photographs of the cave were published after the 1935 expedition.[6][7]

It was a well documented cave by the 1960s.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Abrakurrie Cave". 2012. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  2. ^ "South Australia: Whales & Wildcaves". Diverse Travel Australia. Retrieved 4 January 2006. 
  3. ^ "Abstracts of Papers, Reviews and Abstracts published in Volume 1 (1962) to Volume 9 (1971) of Helictite – Journal of Australasian Speleological Research". Helictite – Journal of Australasian Speleological Research. Archived from the original on 21 July 2005. Retrieved 4 January 2006. 
  4. ^ "A TRIP TO THE CAVES ON THE NULLABOR PLAINS.". Western Mail (Perth: National Library of Australia). 23 November 1889. p. 36. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  5. ^ a b "Caves and Lakes.". The Sydney Morning Herald (National Library of Australia). 20 November 1935. p. 12. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  6. ^ "A Camera Beyond Perth.". Western Mail (Perth: National Library of Australia). 1 December 1938. p. 71. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  7. ^ "Exploring the Nullarbor Caves:.". The Chronicle (Adelaide: National Library of Australia). 12 December 1935. p. 33. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  8. ^ Hill, A. L (1963), Checklist of caves and related features, retrieved 7 June 2014  which includes Abrakurrie Cave (SE WA Nullarbor SH52-14),Koonalda Cave (Far West SA Nullarbor SH52-15) , Knowles Cave (Far West SA Nullarbor SH52-16), Murrawijinie Caves (Far West Nullarbor SA SH52-16) and mentions 154 mapped and 39 unmapped caves by that time

External links[edit]