Absecon, New Jersey

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Absecon, New Jersey
City
City of Absecon
Map of Absecon in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Absecon in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Absecon, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Absecon, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°25′25″N 74°29′35″W / 39.423563°N 74.493025°W / 39.423563; -74.493025Coordinates: 39°25′25″N 74°29′35″W / 39.423563°N 74.493025°W / 39.423563; -74.493025[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated February 29, 1872 (as town)
Reincorporated March 24, 1902 (as city)
Government[7]
 • Type City
 • Mayor John R. Armstrong (term ends December 31, 2015)[3][4]
 • Administrator Jessica Thompson[5]
 • Clerk Carrie A. Crone[6]
Area[1]
 • Total 7.292 sq mi (18.887 km2)
 • Land 5.396 sq mi (13.975 km2)
 • Water 1.896 sq mi (4.911 km2)  26.01%
Area rank 239th of 566 in state
17th of 23 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 3 ft (0.9 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 8,411
 • Estimate (2013)[12] 8,401
 • Rank 272nd of 566 in state
11th of 23 in county[13]
 • Density 1,558.8/sq mi (601.9/km2)
 • Density rank 329th of 566 in state
9th of 23 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08201, 08205[14][15]
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 404, 652, 748[16]
FIPS code 3400100100[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885134[1][19]
Website www.abseconnj.gov

Absecon (pronounced ab-SEE-con[20]) is a city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 8,411,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 773 (+10.1%) from the 7,638 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 340 (+4.7%) from the 7,298 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

The current City of Absecon was originally incorporated as a town by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 29, 1872, from portions of Egg Harbor Township and Galloway Township. Then on March 24, 1902, the City of Absecon replaced the town.[22]

Geography[edit]

Absecon is located at 39°25′25″N 74°29′35″W / 39.423563°N 74.493025°W / 39.423563; -74.493025 (39.423563, −74.493025). According to the United States Census Bureau, Absecon city had a total area of 7.292 square miles (18.887 km2), of which, 5.396 square miles (13.975 km2) of it was land and 1.896 square miles (4.911 km2) of it (26.01%) was water.[1][2]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Absecon, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 43.4
(6.3)
43.7
(6.5)
50.6
(10.3)
59.9
(15.5)
69.9
(21.1)
78.9
(26.1)
83.8
(28.8)
82.5
(28.1)
77.1
(25.1)
67.3
(19.6)
56.5
(13.6)
45.7
(7.6)
63.3
(17.4)
Average low °F (°C) 23.6
(−4.7)
23.8
(−4.6)
30.4
(−0.9)
39.4
(4.1)
49.2
(9.6)
58.9
(14.9)
64.0
(17.8)
62.3
(16.8)
55.7
(13.2)
44.6
(7)
34.3
(1.3)
25.5
(−3.6)
42.6
(5.9)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.4
(86)
3.1
(79)
3.7
(94)
3.5
(89)
3.3
(84)
3.3
(84)
3.8
(97)
5.1
(130)
3.2
(81)
3.4
(86)
3.5
(89)
3.8
(97)
43
(1,092)
Source: Weatherbase[23]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 507
1890 501 −1.2%
1900 530 5.8%
1910 781 47.4%
1920 702 −10.1%
1930 2,158 207.4%
1940 2,084 −3.4%
1950 2,355 13.0%
1960 4,320 83.4%
1970 6,094 41.1%
1980 6,859 12.6%
1990 7,298 6.4%
2000 7,638 4.7%
2010 8,411 10.1%
Est. 2013 8,401 [12][24] −0.1%
Population sources: 1880-2000[25]
1880-1920[26] 1880-1890[27]
1890-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,411 people, 3,179 households, and 2,254 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,558.8 per square mile (601.9/km2). There were 3,365 housing units at an average density of 623.6 per square mile (240.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 76.45% (6,430) White, 9.89% (832) Black or African American, 0.38% (32) Native American, 7.93% (667) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.94% (247) from other races, and 2.41% (203) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.50% (631) of the population.[9]

There were 3,179 households, of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.1% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.07.[9]

In the city, 20.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 31.8% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.1 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.0 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $64,370 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,398) and the median family income was $77,784 (+/- $9,673). Males had a median income of $47,043 (+/- $7,593) versus $43,673 (+/- $3,797) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $31,194 (+/- $4,373). About 5.2% of families and 8.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.4% of those under age 18 and 16.0% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 7,638 people, 2,773 households, and 2,085 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,336.0 people per square mile (515.6/km²). There were 2,902 housing units at an average density of 507.6 per square mile (195.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 83.31% White, 6.01% African American, 0.17% Native American, 7.46% Asian, 1.51% from other races, and 1.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.77% of the population.[31][32]

There were 2,773 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.6% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.8% were non-families. 19.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.08.[31][32]

In the city the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.4 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the city was $55,745, and the median income for a family was $61,563. Males had a median income of $47,984 versus $31,663 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,615. About 3.2% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.9% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Absecon operates under the City form of New Jersey municipal government, led by a Mayor and a seven-member City Council. The City Council consists of six members elected from the city's two wards to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with one seat from each ward up for election each year, along with one member elected at-large to a four-year term in office, all of whom are elected on a partisan basis as part of the November general election.[7][34]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Absecon is Democrat John Armstrong, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[3][35] Members of the Absecon City Council are Council President Chris Seher (R, 2016; Ward 2), Donald E. Camp (R, 2016; Ward 1), Sandy Shenk Cain (D, 2015; Ward 2), Kimberly Horton (D, 2014; Ward 2), Frank Phillips (R, 2015; Ward 1), Michael Ring (R, 2017; At Large) and Jim Vizthum (R, 2014; Ward 1).[36][37][38][39][40]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Absecon is located in the 2nd Congressional district[41] and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.[10][42][43]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[44] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[45] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[46][47]

The 2nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jim Whelan (D, Atlantic City) and in the General Assembly by Chris A. Brown (R, Ventnor City) and John F. Amodeo (D, Northfield).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Atlantic County is governed by a directly elected executive and a nine-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, responsible for legislation. The executive serves a four-year term and the freeholders are elected to staggered three-year terms, of which four are elected from the county on an at-large basis and five of the freeholders represent equally populated districts.[51][52] As of 2014, Atlantic County's Executive is Republican Dennis Levinson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[53] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are Chairman Frank D. Formica, Freeholder District 2, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Linwood, Longport, Margate, Northfield, Somers Point and Ventnor (R, 2015),[54] Vice Chairman John W. Risley, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[55] Colin G. Bell, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2015),[56] James A. Bertino, Freeholder District 5, including Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth (R, 2015),[57] Ernest D. Coursey, Freeholder District 1, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville (R, 2016),[58] Richard Dase, Freeholder District 4, including Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic (D, 2016),[59] Alexander C. Marino, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2014),[60] Will Pauls, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2016)[61] and Frank Sutton, Freeholder District 3, including Egg Harbor Township (part) and Hamilton Township (part) (R, 2014).[62][63][64] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Edward P. McGettigan (2016),[65] Sheriff Frank X. Balles (2014)[66] and Surrogate James Curcio (2015).[67][68]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,629 registered voters in Absecon City, of which 1,353 (24.0% vs. 30.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,716 (30.5% vs. 25.2%) were registered as Republicans and 2,557 (45.4% vs. 44.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[69] Among the city's 2010 Census population, 66.9% (vs. 58.8% in Atlantic County) were registered to vote, including 84.5% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 76.6% countywide).[69][70]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,172 votes (50.6% vs. 57.9% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 2,063 votes (48.1% vs. 41.1%) and other candidates with 43 votes (1.0% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,289 ballots cast by the city's 5,938 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.2% (vs. 65.8% in Atlantic County).[71][72] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,262 votes (49.8% vs. 41.6% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,203 votes (48.5% vs. 56.5%) and other candidates with 41 votes (0.9% vs. 1.1%), among the 4,539 ballots cast by the city's 5,993 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.7% (vs. 68.1% in Atlantic County).[73] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,177 votes (53.6% vs. 46.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,800 votes (44.4% vs. 52.0%) and other candidates with 42 votes (1.0% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,058 ballots cast by the city's 5,201 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.0% (vs. 69.8% in the whole county).[74]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,874 votes (65.0% vs. 60.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 883 votes (30.6% vs. 34.9%) and other candidates with 33 votes (1.1% vs. 1.3%), among the 2,883 ballots cast by the city's 5,991 registered voters, yielding a 48.1% turnout (vs. 41.5% in the county).[75][76] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,501 votes (52.3% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,195 votes (41.6% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 133 votes (4.6% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 21 votes (0.7% vs. 1.2%), among the 2,872 ballots cast by the city's 5,770 registered voters, yielding a 49.8% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[77]

Education[edit]

The Absecon Public School District serve students in Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 825 students and 67.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.31:1.[78] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics.[79]) are H. Ashton Marsh Elementary School[80] (K-5; 482 students) and Emma C. Attales Middle School[81] (5-8; 343 students).[82][83]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students from Absecon can attend Pleasantville High School in Pleasantville as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Pleasantville Public Schools. City public school students are also eligible to attend the Atlantic County Institute of Technology and Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts.[84]

Holy Spirit High School is a Roman Catholic high school, operated under the jurisdiction of the Diocese of Camden.[85][86]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 49.71 miles (80.00 km) of roadways, of which 35.12 miles (56.52 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.54 miles (12.13 km) by Atlantic County and 7.05 miles (11.35 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[87]

Highways and roads in Absecon include U.S. Route 9, U.S. Route 30, Route 157 and County Route 585. The now-defunct Route 43 also passed through the city.

Public transportation[edit]

The Absecon station[88] is served by New Jersey Transit's Atlantic City Line trains, with east-west service between 30th Street Station in Philadelphia and the Atlantic City Rail Terminal in Atlantic City.[89]

NJ Transit provides bus service to and from Atlantic City on routes 508 (to the Hamilton Mall), 554 (to the Lindenwold PATCO station) and 559 (to Lakewood Township).[90][91]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Absecon include:

References[edit]

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