Abu Bakr Ibn Mujāhid

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Abū Bakr Ibn Mujāhid (Arabic: ابن مجاهد) (Full name: أبو بكر أحمد بن موسى بن العباس بن مجاهد التميمي) (born 245AH/859-860CE in Baghdad and died 324AH/936CE) was a scholar of Islamic studies. He studied Qur'ān and Hadith in Baghdad. He was most notable for establishing the seven canonical Qur'anic readings (Qira'at).[1] He was also notable for delivering the charge of heretical Qur'anic exegesis that reopened the trial of Mansur al-Hallaj, and ultimately led to his execution by the Abbasid Caliphate al-Muqtadir.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Christopher Melchert, Ibn Mujāhid and the Establishment of Seven Qur'anic Readings Stable, Studia Islamica, No. 91. (2000), pp. 5-22.
  2. ^ Louis Massignon, The Passion of Al-Hallaj: Mystic and Martyr of Islam, Abridged., trans. Herbert Mason. (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1994), 229-30.