Abu Kishk

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Abu Kishk
PikiWiki Israel 5378 School of Abu Kishek.jpg
Old school of Abu Kishk, picture taken between 1940-1950.
Abu Kishk is located in Mandatory Palestine
Abu Kishk
Abu Kishk
Arabic ابو كشْك
Subdistrict Jaffa
Coordinates 32°8′10.73″N 34°51′55.21″E / 32.1363139°N 34.8653361°E / 32.1363139; 34.8653361Coordinates: 32°8′10.73″N 34°51′55.21″E / 32.1363139°N 34.8653361°E / 32.1363139; 34.8653361
Population 1900[1][2] (1945)
Area 17,121[1] dunams
Date of depopulation 30 March 1948[3]
Cause(s) of depopulation Fear of being caught up in the fighting
Secondary cause Influence of nearby town's fall
Current localities Herzliya[4]

Abu Kishk (Arabic: أبو كشك) was a Palestinian village in the Jaffa Subdistrict located 12 km northeast of Jaffa, situated 2 km northwest of the Yarkon River. The village was depopulated during the 1947–1948 Civil War in Mandatory Palestine on 30 March 1948 by the Israeli attacking brigade of the Irgun Tzvai Leumi.

The "Arab Abu-Kishk" is a bedouin tribe that owned large areas in the Sharon plain, from Herzliya to Petah-Tikva.[citation needed]

On 1921 Abu Kishk and other near Arabs villages attacked the Jewish villages, Petah Tikva and Kfar Saba. The attack was foiled, and Abu Kishk Sheikh was sentenced to pay a big fine to the Jews. Therefore, he was coerced to sell his territories. On 4 June 1924 The Jewish organization Hachsharat HaYishuv purchased territories of 4,197 Dunam for 3.5 Palestine pound per dunam.

In 1945 the population of the village was about 1,900, about 300 of them lived in the area of the future Herzliya.[5]

Location[edit]

The village was situated about 2 kilometers (1.2 mi) northwest of the Yarkon River. Secondary roads linked it to the Jaffa-Haifa highway and to neighboring villages.[2]

History[edit]

In 1925 the village school was founded. By the mid-1940s it had 108 students, including 9 girls.[2]

At the time of the 1931 census, Abu Kishk had a population of 1007 Muslims.[6]

In 1944/45 a total of 2,486 dunums of village land was used for citrus or bananas, 14,018 was planted with cereals; while 226 dunums were irrigated or used for orchards.[4][7]

Seif Eddid AbuKish and prince, (later king) Abdullah I of Jordan

1948, and aftermath[edit]

In December 1947 and January 1948 the leaders of al-Shaykh Muwannis, Al-Mas'udiyya, Al-Jammasin al-Sharqi/Al-Jammasin al-Gharbi, and the mukhtars of Ijlil al-Qibliyya, Ijlil al-Shamaliyya and Abu Kishk met with Haganah representatives in Petah Tikva. These villages wanted peace, and promised not to harbor any Arab Liberation Armies or local Arab Militia. They further promised that, in the case they were not able to keep them out alone, they were to call on Haganah for help.[8]

By mid-March 1948, the Alexandroni Brigade had imposed isolation, a "quarantine", of al-Shaykh Muwannis, Ijlil al-Qibliyya, Ijlil al-Shamaliyya and Abu Kishk. However, on 12th March LHI kidnapped 5 village notables from al-Shaykh Muwannis.[9] This completely undermined the villagers' trust in former agreements, and many left.[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hadawi, 1970, p.52
  2. ^ a b c Khalidi, 1992, p. 235
  3. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xviii village #197. Also gives causes of depopulation
  4. ^ a b Khalidi, 1992, p. 236
  5. ^ Herzliya, "Mother of the Kibbutzim and the Communal Groups", by Dan Yahav. Yaron Golan Publishers.
  6. ^ E. Mills, ed. (1932). Census of Palestine 1931. Population of Villages, Towns and Administrative Areas. Jerusalem: Government of Palestine. p. 16. 
  7. ^ Hadawi, 1970, p.95
  8. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 91
  9. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 127
  10. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 128

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]