Abuhav synagogue

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Interior

The Abuhav Synagogue is a 15th-century synagogue in Safed, Israel, named after 15th-century Spanish rabbi and kabbalist, Isaac Abuhav. Its design is said to be based upon kabbalistic teachings.

Interior[edit]

Tradition states that Abuhav, who never left Spain, designed the synagogue and his disciples erected the building when they arrived in the 1490s after their expulsion from Spain.[1][2][3] Another legend claims that the synagogue was transported miraculously from Spain to Safed.[4] The synagogue was almost completely destroyed in the 1837 earthquake, only the southern wall containing the Arks remained standing and exists today as a remnant of the original building.[3]

The bimah has six steps representing the six working days of the week; the top level is seventh, representing the Shabbat. The Holy Ark has three sections and contain Torah scrolls traditionally written by Abuhav himself and Solomon Ohana of Fes, Morocco.


Coordinates: 32°58′8.62″N 35°29′29.02″E / 32.9690611°N 35.4913944°E / 32.9690611; 35.4913944

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grishaver, Josh Barkin & Lurie, Joel. Artzeinu: An Israel Encounter, Torah Aura Productions, July 1, 2008. pg. 133.
  2. ^ Andrew Humphreys; Neil Tilbury (30 November 1996). Israel and the Palestinian territories. Lonely Planet Publications. p. 284. ISBN 978-0-86442-399-3. Retrieved 29 December 2011. 
  3. ^ a b The Abuhav Synagogue, Jewish Virtual Library.
  4. ^ Linda Kay Davidson; David Martin Gitlitz (1 November 2002). Pilgrimage: from the Ganges to Graceland : an encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO. p. 549. ISBN 978-1-57607-004-8. Retrieved 29 December 2011.